Blue Angel F-18 Hornet

PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM UNVEILS SLEEK BLUE ANGEL F-18 HORNET
Tucson—Aug. 1, 2013. Pima Air & Space Museum unveiled its recently-acquired McDonnell-Douglas (Boeing) F/A-18A Hornet, with the paint scheme of a U.S. Navy Blue Angel.

The Hornet was developed in the mid-1970s as a replacement for the F-4 Phantom and the A-7 Corsair that were then in use by the U.S. Navy and Marines as ground attack aircraft. The F/A-18 was derived from the YF-17 that had competed for the U.S. Air Force contract that resulted in the F-16 Fighting Falcon. The YF-17 was redesigned to add more fuel, folding wings, and strengthened landing gear among other changes to adapt it for use from aircraft carriers. The first production versions of the Hornet went into service with the Navy and Marines in 1983. Most of the early F/A-18A Hornets have been retired but some continue to fly with Navy and Marine training squadrons. The F/A-18C and the newest F/A-18E and F Super Hornets are the primary fighters and attack aircraft for the US Navy and Marines. Hornets have been sold to several foreign nations including Australia, Canada, Spain, Switzerland, Finland, Kuwait, and Malaysia.

The F/A-18 was adopted by the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels aerial demonstration team in 1986 and still is flying today. It has now served with the team for 26 years. That makes it the longest serving aircraft type to fly with the Navy’s aerial demonstration team.

The plane, a model caricaturized by two of Disney’s main characters—Echo and Bravo— in the new animated movie, “Planes,” is placed prominently in the row of U.S. Naval Fighters (enabling Flight Grill restaurant patrons to admire it while dining).

James Stemm, Pima Air & Space Museum Curator of Collections, commented, “We have been working long and hard to secure the F/A-18A. It truly enhances our collection. We are grateful to our partners, the U.S. Navy, for this aircraft.”

Current Markings: U.S. Navy Blue Angels, 2012

Service History:
Built by McDonnell-Douglas Aircraft, St. Louis, Missouri and delivered to the U.S. Navy. (Service history not yet available.)

Technical Specifications:
Wingspan: 40 ft.
Length: 56 ft.
Height: 15 ft. 4 in.
Weight: 36,970 pounds (loaded)
Maximum Speed: Mach 1.8
Service Ceiling: 50,000 ft.
Range: 1,089 miles
Engines: Two General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofans with 16,000 pounds of thrust
Crew: 1

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft: the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane); a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs); the world’s smallest bi-plane; the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident); plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. Explore five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena including the largest paper airplane (our work). Two+ hangars are dedicated to WWII, one each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space even maintains its own aircraft restoration center. The museum also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook www.facebook.com/PimaAirAndSpace, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Attachment: PASMF-18.jpg; Photo by John Bezosky.

blue-angel-pasm

Pima Air and Space News Release

Real Aircraft From Disney’s “Planes” at The Pima Air & Space Museum

SEE THE REAL PLANES FROM DISNEY’S PLANES AT THE PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM!
Tucson, AZ–Jul. 31, 2013. Get “up close and personal” with the planes that inspired the characters of Disney’s Planes at the Pima Air & Space Museum. Visitors can also enter for a chance to win a family 4-pack of tickets to Disney’s Planes’ VIP Advanced Screening at the AMC Foothills Theater on Aug. 6, 2013. (Act quickly! Entry deadline is Sun., Aug. 4, 2013. Paid admission to the museum is not required to enter the contest.)

Visitors can examine and learn about the real-life counterparts that inspired Disney’s Planes’ characters, such as the supersonic F-18 Hornet (new at the museum) that resembles two characters Bravo and Echo and the Vought F4U Corsair that’s a shoo-in for Skipper. The museum “identifies with” 12 of the movie’s 14 main characters portrayed in the trailer, including:

• Ripslinger—a North American P-51 Mustang,
• Leadbottom—a WACO Bi-plane 7-UPF,
• Ned and Zed—Cassutt Formula One Pylon Racers,
• Rochelle—a Beechcraft N-35 Bonanza (check out the unique v-shaped tail),
• Ishani—the Rutan Long-EZ, and
• Dusty—a crop-duster designed by Leland Snow.

On the museum’s tram tour look out for the forklift and tanker truck that inspired Dottie and Chug, respectively, but be forewarned, Dottie’s a workin’ gal and may be hard at work elsewhere on the museum grounds. A comparison sheet with the characters and details on the Pima Air & Space’s planes is being distributed at the museum. The look-alikes are located throughout the museum (indoors and out) and are designated by Disney Planes movie posters.

There are 2 ways to enter the contest for tickets to the advanced screening.
1. email [email protected] before midnight Aug. 4, 2013, or
2. come to the museum and fill in an entry form in the Museum Store. Entrants must be 18 years old to enter and be available to arrive at the AMC Foothills Theater at 6pm on Aug. 6th for the 7pm show. The Pima Air & Space Museum is open daily from 9am to 5pm with last admittance at 4pm. The new lower adult-admission fee to the museum for Pima County residents is $12.25.

“We are already noting an increase in aviation interest,” commented Mina Stafford, Curator of Education, “It’s a great opportunity to teach the scientific principles of flight and the aspects that differentiate each of the plane designs, building on the kids’ enthusiasm. Plus, it’s fun!” A special “Find the Disney ‘Planes’ Planes” scavenger hunt (featuring stickers!!!) will be featured at the museum’s season finale Night Wings summer-evening event on Sat., Aug. 24th (5 to 9pm, with reduced admissions: $10 for adults, kids 12 & under FREE).

ABOUT THE MOVIE
From above the world of “Cars” comes “Disney’s Planes,” an action-packed 3D animated comedy adventure featuring Dusty (voice of Dane Cook), a plane with dreams of competing as a high-flying air racer. But Dusty’s not exactly built for racing—and he happens to be afraid of heights. So he turns to a seasoned naval aviator who helps Dusty qualify to take on the defending champ of the race circuit. Dusty’s courage is put to the ultimate test as he aims to reach heights he never dreamed possible, giving a spellbound world the inspiration to soar. “Disney’s Planes” takes off in theaters on Aug. 9, 2013.
www.Disney.com/Planes
www.Facebook.com/DisneyPlanes
www.Twitter.com/DisneyPicture

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings.) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft: the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane); a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs); the world’s smallest bi-plane; the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident); plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. Explore five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. Two+ hangars are dedicated to WWII, one each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook www.facebook.com/PimaAirAndSpace, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: The 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum, located on the Pima Air & Space Museum grounds, is closed for reconstruction until further notice.

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Worldwide TripAdvisor Top-Ranked, Excellent Attraction

THE PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM RANKS IN THE TOP 10% WORLDWIDE OF EXCELLENT ATTRACTIONS… AGAIN!
Tucson, AZ–Jul. 20, 2013. TripAdvisor has awarded the Pima Air & Space Museum the Top 10% IN THE WORLD Certificate of Excellence for the second year in a row. The certificate recognizes the top-performing businesses on TripAdvisor, and is only awarded to businesses that rank in the top 10% worldwide for traveler feedback aka excellent ratings. The Pima Air & Space Museum/Arizona Aerospace Foundation also earned the Certificate of Excellence in 2012.

“We are honored to receive this distinction,” stated Yvonne Morris, Executive Director of the not-for-profit Arizona Aerospace Foundation that operates Pima Air & Space. She continued, “We are proud to provide our visitors with great experiences thanks to our hard-working, dedicated staff and volunteers. This award is as much theirs as it is ours.”

The consistently great feedback the Pima Air & Space Museum has received on TripAdvisor for the past two years proves it is a world-class destination. The awesome aircraft and knowledgeable and helpful staff/volunteers are just two reasons why travelers find the museum to be a standout among world-travel destinations.

With the TripAdvisor endorsement, seventy-five percent of surveyed travelers said they were more likely to “visit.” [Source: TripAdvisor Member Survey, October 2012.]

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft: the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane); a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs); the world’s smallest bi-plane; the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident); plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. Explore five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena including the largest paper airplane (our work). Two+ hangars are dedicated to WWII, one each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/PimaAirAndSpace, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: The 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is closed for reconstruction until further notice.

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Attachment: PASMTripAdvisor2013Top10PercentAward.pdf;
PASMDocentKenHollettMariner.jpg = Docent Ken Hollett informing a tour on the PBM-5A Martin Mariner, one of only two in existence.
PASMHangar4.jpg=Pima Air & Space Museum’s Asian-theater World War II hangar
PASMDocentKeithConnollyElectra.jpg = docent Keith Connolly holding kids rapt attention in front of the Lockheed Model 10 Electra, the same airplane type that Amelia Earhart flew.

docent-tour-martin-mariner

Docent Ken Hollett informing a tour on the PBM-5A Martin Mariner, one of only two in existence.

asian-theater-hanger

Pima Air & Space Museum’s Asian-theater World War II hangar

lockheed-model-10

Docent Keith Connolly holding kids rapt attention in front of the Lockheed Model 10 Electra, the same airplane type that Amelia Earhart flew.

Pima Air and Space News Release

Second “Night Wings” Summer Evening Program Special Features

PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM ANNOUNCES RADIO-CONTROLLED JETS AND LEGO ROBOTICS AS THE SPECIAL FEATURES FOR ITS JULY 27TH “NIGHT WINGS” PROGRAM AND WINNERS OF ITS JUNE COLORING CONTEST
TUCSON—Jul. 12, 2013. The Pima Air & Space Museum announced radio-controlled jets AND Lego Robotics as the special features during its second “Night Wings” summer evening program Sat., Jul. 27th 5 to 9pm. Clay Sherrow, radio-controlled jet enthusiast, will be revving up one of his four planes at 7 and 8pm and displaying 4 of his collection valued at approximately $20,000. “The ‘fire burst’ when the engine starts is fantastic, especially at dusk,” claims Sherrow. The museum’s display area is not conducive for an actual take-off however a radio-controlled flight simulator will be available for everyone to try their hand at controlling a powerful RC jet.

Everyone can also try their hand at the museum’s new Lego Robotics activity too: charting the route and maneuvering a plane, island hopping across the Pacific Ocean. “These robots are amazing!” noted Mina Stafford, Curator of Education at Pima Air & Space Museum, just back from Robotics Camp, “And fun. They are an enthralling addition to our Education and Outreach programs.”

Other kids’ activities include: a coloring/drawing contest, impact craters, sampling space food (ice cream, YUM!), climbing in the cockpit of the Shooting Star high-speed jet trainer (photo op Mom), plane spotting, and prizes too, including a chance to win a free family membership. These activities are in addition to the museum’s fantastic planes contrasted by the setting sun and inside almost four football fields of hangars. So join us, rain or shine! Adults only $10. Kids 12 & under are FREE. For only $4 more you can ride the tram and breeze around the 150 planes on the grounds (departure at 6:30 pm). Great food—burgers, salads, pizza and ice cream—will be available in The Fight Grill.

The Winners of the June Night Wings coloring/free-hand drawing contest are: Melanie Shane, age 4; Kyle Valenzuela, age 8; and Gabi Elles, age 11. Each child wins a Crew/family membership to Pima Air & Space and Titan Missile Museum for one year! Creations attached. The August (and final for the summer) Night Wings will be held on Sat., Aug. 24, 2013.

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings.) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft: the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane); a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs); the world’s smallest bi-plane; the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident); plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. Explore five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. Two+ hangars are dedicated to WWII, one each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: The 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is closed for reconstruction until further notice.

###

Attachments:
PASMNightWings2013-06-22 19.57.14 = sun setting on Night Wings attendees 2013 (photo by mee)
PASMNightWingsT33LiamLewis = Liam Lewis in the cockpit of the T-33 Shooting Star and getting the thumbs up from Dad (photo by mee)
PASMNightWingsJacobCalebLoos = Jacob & Caleb Loos creating seltzer rockets with community volunteers from Raytheon Missile Systems (photo by mee)

sun-setting-night-wings

Sun setting on Night Wings attendees 2013

liam-lewis-cockpit

Liam Lewis in the cockpit of the T-33 Shooting Star and getting the thumbs up from Dad

seltzer-rockets

Jacob & Caleb Loos creating seltzer rockets with community volunteers from Raytheon Missile Systems

Visit from Australian Aviator Ryan Campbell

WORLD-RECORD SEEKING YOUTH AVIATOR CHOSE FLIGHT PATH TO VISIT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM!
Tucson, AZ–Jul. 12, 2013 19-year-old Australian Aviator Ryan Campbell is choosing his world-record-breaking solo-circumnavigation route with a stopover at Pima Air & Space Museum (on Jul. 15, 2013)! Campbell, who is seeking to break the Guinness World Record for the youngest aviator to fly solo around the world–and to be the first teenager–departed Australia on June 30, 2013, and will arrive at Pima Air & Space Museum on Jul. 15, 2013. According to his spokesman/mother Joanne, “He [Ryan] has chosen Tucson as one of his stops across the USA so that he might get to tour your museum.” Arizona Aerospace Foundation Executive Director Yvonne Morris, who oversees the Pima Air & Space Museum, states, “We are truly complimented that Ryan planned his route to visit us. We frequently hear that Pima Air & Space Museum is the impetus for Tucson-destination vacation plans from all across the globe. We wish Ryan the best of luck in obtaining his goal.” On average, twenty-two percent of visitors to the Pima Air & Space Museum are from foreign countries (Source: Visitor Exit Surveys 2009-present).

Campbell did his homework. As recommended, to maximize his day and assure his seat on the tours offered, Campbell plans to arrive at Pima Air & Space Museum as it opens at 9am on Monday morning. Campbell also wishes to tour the “Boneyard” aka the 309 Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group, abbreviated as AMARG, which can only be toured via the Pima Air & Space Museum Monday through Friday. The 309th AMARG Commander Col. Robert Lepper has asked to meet Campbell while he is on the Davis-Monthan base.

Campbell’s amazing journey can be tracked on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TeenWorldFlight), Twitter (#‎TeenWorldFlight), his blog (http://www.teenworldflight.com/blog.html) and webpage (http://www.teenworldflight.com/my-achievements.html).

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed like Ryan Campbell at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings.) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft: the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane); a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs); the world’s smallest bi-plane; the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident); plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. Explore five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. Two+ hangars are dedicated to WWII, one each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: The 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is closed for reconstruction until further notice.

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Attachments: PASMHangar4.JPG = featuring the B-29 “Superfortress”
PASMSOFGallery.jpg = featuring the SR-71, world’s fastest spy plane

hanger4-superfortress

Hangar 4 featuring the B-29 “Superfortress”

fatest-spy-plane

SR-71, the world’s fastest spy plane

Titan Missile Museum 50 Year Anniversary

TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM COMMEMORATES 50 YEARS OF THE BANG THAT NEVER WAS!
Sahuarita, AZ – Jun. 28, 2013. The Titan Missile Museum announced commemorative celebrations marking 50 years since the actual Titan II site, 571-7, went operational on Jul. 15, 1963. Celebrations include:

• an extra-special Moonlight MADness on Sat. evening, Jul. 13, during which you can win a chance to sound the alarm! (Reservations required, call 625-7736).
• an official Pima County proclamation,
• special tours on Mon., Jul. 15th by past commanders,
• FREE Titan Missile Museum admission for anyone born during July, 1963—the same month and year the site went operational—from Jul 15, 2013 through Aug. 31, 2013! (ID required).

The extra-special Moonlight MADness/cool summer evening event (Sat., Jul 13, 5 to 9pm, cost $7/adult, kids 12 & Under FREE) features:

• Professional chalk artists and community “chalking” on the massive 760-ton silo door

o Chris Leon
o Jamie Tooley
o Matt Cotten
o Greg Ewald

• Expanded viewing sites for the missile, lit up!
• The Thunderbolt siren (that once signaled evacuation) being set off by community members

o The 6pm siren “pulled” by the winner of a Facebook contest (enter by 7/1/13 at https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Titan-Missile-Museum/225757590289?fref=ts)
o 6:30, 7, 7:30 and 8pm sirens to be set off by onsite drawing winners (among other prizes)

• Southern Arizona Rocketry Assn. and Raytheon displays and plus activities for kids including “MAD” scientist seltzer rockets
• The Flight Grill Food Truck (from the Pima Air & Space Museum) serving a special family-centric “grab ‘n go’ menu
• Book signing by Titan Archivist and Historian Chuck Penson
• No fireworks (remember, this is the bang that wasn’t)
• Reservations at 625-7736.

“Thank goodness none of the Titan II missiles were ever launched from the U.S. so we can celebrate the success of the historic strategy that deterred our enemies; and commemorate 50 years since it went operational,” commented Yvonne Morris, a past Titan II missile silo commander and now Executive Director of the Arizona Aerospace Foundation (that operates the Titan Missile Museum). “I especially recommend coming to chalk on the massive silo doors, and see the masterpieces the professionals create inspired by the program,” continued Morris, “fifty years later, it’s continuing to execute its mission through education.” For a detailed history of the development of rocketry and the missile program see the attached article by Titan Missile Museum Archivist and Historian Chuck Penson entitled “Deterrence and the Ultimate Weapon.” Special commemorative coins will be available for purchase.

ABOUT THE TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM
The Titan Missile Museum is the only remaining Titan II site, open to the public, allowing you to relive a time when the threat of nuclear war between the U.S. and the former Soviet Union was a reality. The Titan II was capable of launching from its underground silo in 58 seconds and could deliver a nine megaton thermonuclear warhead to its target more than 5,500 miles away in less than thirty minutes. For more than two decades, 54 Titan II missile complexes across the United States stood “on alert” 24 hours a day, seven days a week, heightening the threat of nuclear war or preventing Armageddon, depending upon your point of view. To visit the Titan Museum, take I-19 to exit 69 Duval Mine Road west in Sahuarita, AZ. Open daily 8:45am to 5pm, except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Tours on the hour. More information can be found at www.titanmissilemuseum.org or by calling 520 625-7736. Yvonne Morris is available for interviews.

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Attachments: titan2launch.jpg; TMM571-7 now color.jpg; TMM571-7 then.jpg

test-launch

Test launch of a Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile from Vandenberg Air Force Base

missle-site

Missile site 571-7 as it appears today. By 1980, civilization had encroached significantly on the complex, causing much concern among Air Force officials. Photgrpahy by Chuck Penson and pilot Bert Zaccaria

missle-site2

Missile site 571-7 under construction in 1962. The silo cover is seen at the left side of excavation, with the blast lock and control center to the right.

Free Admission to Active-Duty Military & Their Families on July 4th

SALUTING ACTIVE-DUTY SERVICE PERSONNEL: PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM OFFERING FREE ADMISSION TO ACTIVE-DUTY MILITARY & THEIR FAMILIES ON JULY 4TH
Tucson, AZ—Jun. 28, 2013. Pima Air & Space Museum announced FREE admission for active military, their spouses and dependents this Independence Day (Thu., Jul. 4, 2013). The museum would like to thank our active military for their service during these tough financial times by offering FREE admission [during normal business hours 9 AM to 5 PM (last admission 4 PM)] for one day only, July 4, 2013. Military ID is required for admission.
“We are happy to offer a little perk to our military especially in light of recent cutbacks for the July 4th holiday,” stated Yvonne Morris, Executive Director of the not-for-profit Arizona Aerospace Foundation that operates Pima Air & Space. She continued, “It’s always heartwarming to watch the enthusiasm as parents share their knowledge of our collection with their kids.”

Pima Air & Space’s onsite restaurant, Flight Grill, will be open as usual. The docent-narrated tram tour ($6pp) facilitates experiencing the amazing outdoor aircrafts over the museum’s 80 acres. Due to the holiday, the “Boneyard”/AMARG tours will not be available. Pima Air & Space Museum traditionally offers free admission for active-duty military on Veterans Day and Memorial Day, however this is a one-time offer for July 4th– only for 2013.

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum! Pima Air & Space is one of the largest aviation museums in the world, and the largest non-government-funded aviation museum in the U.S. The museum maintains a collection of more than 300 aircraft and spacecraft from around the globe with 125,000+ artifacts. Exhibits at the museum include some of the world’s greatest aviation heritage, including commercial, military and civil aviation. Among them are the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane), a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster and carried more bombs), the world’s smallest flying bi-plane, a moon rock and planes used as canvases by renown contemporary artists including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. The museum has five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. The Museum also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base grounds plus a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres of airplanes (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd. in Tucson. More information about the museum can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: The 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is closed for reconstruction until further notice.

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Attachment: Staff photos: PASMWWIIB-29.jpg; PASMDadHueyDaughterReflection.jpg

wwii-b-29

WWII B-29

father-daughter-reflection

Father & Daughter looking at reflection in Huey

Rare Bell P-39N Airacobra

PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM ANNOUNCES AN ASTONISHING ADDITION TO ITS INDOOR COLLECTION: THE RARE BELL P-39N AIRACOBRA
Tucson, AZ–Jun. 13, 2013. The Pima Air & Space Museum added a “recovered from the jungle” and newly restored aircraft to its Pacific–theater WWII Hangar: the rare Bell
P-39N Airacobra.

The Bell P-39N Airacobra, serial number 42-18814, began its life at Bell Aircraft’s factory in New York in April 1943. It was shipped to the 5th Air Force in New Guinea where it served until it crashed at Tadji Airfield on the northern coast of New Guinea. It was stripped of useful parts and shoved into the airfield’s surrounding jungle. For the next 30 years, it laid undisturbed as the jungle grew up over it. In 1974, it was recovered by an Australian aircraft fanatic named Charles Darby, who was contracted to recover wrecked aircraft from New Guinea and return them to America to be restored and displayed in museums.

When the P-39 first appeared in 1937 it was an unusual design. Among its many unorthodox design features are the mounting of the engine behind the pilot, the use of an automobile-type door on the side of the cockpit, and the tricycle landing gear. The Airacobra had good low-altitude performance, but suffered at high altitudes. Fortunately, the aircraft’s large, nose-mounted 37mm cannon made it a perfect ground attack aircraft. Large numbers of P-39s were exported to the Soviet Union where they were very popular in this role. The Airacobra was never popular in American or British service, but they still served in combat during the early stages of the war while more capable types were being designed and built. Current Markings: 110th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, New Guinea, 1944 with “Girlie” on its “automobile-type” door.

Service History
The P-39 was recovered from Tadji, New Guinea in 1974 by Charles Darby and his crew (who were contracted by David Tallichet, an American aircraft collector). The crew was tasked with recovering as many wrecked aircraft as possible from New Guinea and bringing them back to America. The 42-18814, along with numerous other Airacobra hulks, was laboriously disassembled and hauled out of the jungle by hand until it could be loaded onto trucks for the first leg of its trip back to the United States. Eventually arriving in Chino, California, the decades-long restoration of the plane began as it traveled to many museums and restoration shops. In 2004, the partially restored plane was placed on loan to the Pima Air & Space Museum for restoration and display. In 2010, staff and volunteers began the process of turning a pile of parts into a finished, restored, fighter plane. Three years later, the rebuilt and repainted aircraft joined the other World War II era aircraft displayed in the museum’s Hangar 4, representing the US Army Air Forces’ efforts in the Southwest Pacific.

Technical Specifications:
Wingspan: 34 ft
Length: 30 ft 2 in
Height: 12 ft 5 in
Weight: 8,300 lbs (loaded)
Maximum Speed: 385 miles per hour
Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft
Range: 650 miles
Engine: One Allison V-1710-85 12-cylinder engine with 1,200 horsepower
Crew: 1

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Be wowed at Pima Air & Space Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world and the largest non-government-funded in the U.S. (TripAdvisor ranks it in the Top 10% worldwide for excellent ratings.) Its significant collection, 300 strong from around the globe, covers commercial, military and civil aviation alongside more than 125,000+ artifacts, including a moon rock donated by Tucsonan and Astronaut Frank Borman. Be amazed by many all-time great aircraft: the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane); a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster plus carried more bombs); the world’s smallest bi-plane; the C-54 (the Berlin Airlift’s star flown by the famous “Candy Bomber” Col. USAF (Ret.) Gail Halvorsen, a Tucson-area winter resident); plus planes used as renowned-contemporary-artists’ canvases, including Brazilian graffiti artist Nunca. Explore five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. Two+ hangars are dedicated to WWII, one each to the European and Pacific theaters. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center. It also operates exclusive tours of the “Boneyard,” aka the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, plus offers a docent-led tram tour of its 80 acres (additional fees apply). Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd., just off I-10 exit 267, in Tucson. More information can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: The 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is closed for reconstruction until further notice.

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Attachments: PASMBellP-39Njungle.jpg; PASMbellP-39NReconstruction.jpg, photo by John Bezosky; PASMBellP-39N. jpg, photo by John Bezosky

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Bell P-39 in the jungle

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Bell P-39 being reconstructed

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Bell P-39 Airacobra

Pima County Resident Entry Fee At Titan Missile Museum

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Mary E Emich
Director of Marketing, Sales
and Visitor Services
Arizona Aerospace Foundation
6000 East Valencia Road
Tucson, AZ 85756
Phone (520) 618-4805
[email protected]

NEW PIMA COUNTY RESIDENT ENTRY FEE AT TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM!
PLUS NEW LOWER FEE AT PIMA AIR AND SPACE

Tucson—May 3, 2013. The Arizona Aerospace Foundation announced that beginning Jun. 1, 2013 a new Pima County resident fee will be introduced for the Titan Missile Museum (only $8.50!). In addition, the Pima County resident entrance fee at Pima Air & Space Museum will be reduced to $12.25 (from $12.75). Yes, lower prices! That’s a one dollar savings for adults at Titan Missile Museum and $3.25 savings for adults at Pima Air & Space Museum versus regular adult admissions. Pima County officials and the AAF want local residents to explore and enjoy their local museums. “We are happy to see the Arizona Aerospace Foundation making a strong effort to invite Pima County residents to both of their unique and world-class museums,” states Tom Moulton, Director of Pima County Economic Development and Tourism.

Yvonne Morris, Executive Director of the AAF states, “We are pleased to offer our neighbors lower pricing and are glad the new pricing takes effect during the summer when you and your family can ‘beat the heat’ at both of the museums.” The Titan Missile Museum tours, included with every admission, take you thirty-five feet underground where it’s temperate year-round. Pima Air & Space offers almost four football fields of indoor air-cooled exhibit space full of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena to explore.

Children age 6 & under are free at both museums.

Other summer “beat the heat” opportunities for local residents and visitors alike are our cool Saturday evening summer programs with special kids’ activities from 5-9pm:

• Titan Missile Museum’s “Moonlight MADness” (Jun. 8, Jul. 13, Aug. 10, Sep. 14) when adult admission is only $7 and kids 12 & under (and members) are FREE. Space is limited for “Moonlight Madness;” advanced reservations are required, and are allotted on a first reserved, first served basis. For reservations email [email protected] or call 520 625-7736.
• Pima Air and Space Museum’s “Night Wings” (Jun. 22, Jul. 28, Aug. 25) when adult admission is only $10 and kids 12 & under (and members) are FREE. Touch 100 years of aviation history. Flight Grill will remain open.
More information regarding these events is forthcoming.

ABOUT THE TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM

The Titan Missile Museum is the only remaining Titan II site, open to the public, allowing you to relive a time when the threat of nuclear war between the U.S. and the former Soviet Union was a reality. The Titan II was capable of launching from its underground silo in 58 seconds and could deliver a nine megaton thermonuclear warhead to its target more than 5,500 miles away in less than thirty minutes. For more than two decades, 54 Titan II missile complexes across the United States stood “on alert” 24 hours a day, seven days a week, heightening the threat of nuclear war or preventing Armageddon, depending upon your point of view. To visit the Titan Museum, take I-19 to exit 69 Duval Mine Road west in Sahuarita, AZ. More information can be found at www.titanmissilemuseum.org

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM

The Pima Air & Space Museum is one of the largest aviation museums in the world, and the largest non-government funded aviation museum in the United States. The museum maintains a collection of more than 300 aircraft and spacecraft from around the globe and more than 125,000 artifacts. Exhibits at the museum include some of the world’s greatest aviation heritage, including military, commercial, and civil aviation. Among them are the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane), a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster and carried more bombs) and a rare World War II German V-1 “buzz bomb.” The museum has five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. In addition, the 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is located on the museum grounds. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center and offers exclusive tours of the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), also known as the “Boneyard,” on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base grounds. Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd. in Tucson. More information about the museum can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, or by calling 520 574-0462.

ABOUT THE ARIZONA AEROSPACE FOUNDATION

Incorporated in the state of Arizona on November 20, 1967, as the Tucson Air Museum, the Arizona Aerospace Foundation is a member-based non-profit foundation, funded by gate admissions, concessions and donations. The Foundation operates the Pima Air & Space Museum and the Arizona Aviation Hall of Fame in Tucson, Arizona, and the Titan Missile Museum in Sahuarita, Arizona. The AAF’s mission is to create unlimited horizons in aerospace education through the preservation and presentation of the history of flight.

Newly Restored Avro Shackleton

COME OUT FROM YOUR BUNKER MAY 18TH TO SEE THE BRITISH INVASION, INCLUDING THE NEWLY RESTORED AVRO SHACKLETON, AT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
Tucson, AZ—Apr. 18, 2013. The British have landed! Mobilize your crew to explore all things English as PASM celebrates the 60th anniversary of its newly restored Avro Shackleton marine patrol plane on May 18th. Spy classic United Kingdom Triumph motorcycles and other wheels. Sample culinary delights of the Commonwealth at our Flight Grill. Gather reconnaissance in the Shackleton’s belly. Climb into the English Electric Lightning cockpit too, the only domestically-developed Mach 2 operated by the Royal Air Force. Climb aboard the “British Invasion Trolley” for a free ride to see 12 of our 13 British aircraft outside. (Lucky 13 is in an air-cooled hangar.) All included with paid admissions on May, 18, 2013 during normal operating hours (9 to 5, with the last admittance at 4:00pm).

ABOUT THE SHACKLETON:
http://www.pimaair.org/collection-detail.php?cid=386

Soon after the end of World War II the Royal Air Force issued a requirement for a new four-engine long-range maritime patrol plane to replace its American-made Liberators and Fortresses. The Avro company responded with a new design based on the Lincoln bomber. The aircraft used the Lincoln’s wings and landing gear as well as parts from the earlier Lancaster bomber but with a shorter fuselage and higher powered Rolls-Royce Griffon engines driving six-blade counter rotating propellers. The new design was named Shackleton after the famous British South Pole explorer and entered service in February 1951. Beginning in 1971 a dozen Shackleton MR.2s were modified into Airborne Early Warning aircraft by the addition of radar systems and domes removed from the Fairey Gannet. These aircraft served with the RAF until 1991 when the last of them were retired.

Technical specifications
Wingspan 120 ft
Length 87 ft 4 in
Height 17 ft 6 in
Maximum Speed 300 mph
Service Ceiling

20,200 ft
Range 3,660 miles
Engines 4 Rolls-Royce Griffon Mk. 58 with 2,450 horsepower each
Crew 10
http://www.pimaair.org/collection-detail.php?cid=97

ABOUT PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
The Pima Air & Space Museum is one of the largest aviation museums in the world, and the largest non-government funded aviation museum in the United States. The museum maintains a collection of more than 300 aircraft and spacecraft from around the globe and more than 125,000 artifacts. Exhibits at the museum include some of the world’s greatest aviation heritage, including military, commercial, and civil aviation. Among them are the SR-71 Blackbird (the world’s fastest spy plane), a B-29 Superfortress (the WWII bomber that flew higher, farther and faster and carried more bombs) and a rare World War II German V-1 “buzz bomb.” The museum has five large hangars totaling more than 177,000 indoor square feet—almost four football fields¬—of air/space craft, heroes’ stories and scientific phenomena. In addition, the 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum is located on the museum grounds. Pima Air & Space maintains its own aircraft restoration center and offers exclusive tours of the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), also known as the “Boneyard,” on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base grounds. Pima Air & Space Museum is located at 6000 E. Valencia Rd. in Tucson. More information about the museum can be found at www.pimaair.org, on Facebook, or by calling 520 574-0462.

Note: the 390th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Memorial Museum, also located on the PASM museum grounds, is temporarily closed for remodeling.

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Attachments: Photos of the Shackleton as it is being restored. Note the intricate riveting covering about 50,000 square feet of surface area. Before painting, the entire surface must be hand sanded; a machine would grind up the rivets.