Bell HTL-2 Sioux

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
Test Squadron 3 (VX-3), San Diego Naval Air Station, California
Designation
HTL-2
Registration
N1358N
Serial Number
122952

Bell HTL-2 Sioux

In May 1946 the Bell Model 47 became the first helicopter in the world to receive a commercial type certificate. The helicopter’s high price, over $20,000 resulted in few early commercial sales, but the military showed an early interest in the design and the Army acquired its first example in December 1946. HTL-2 is the Navy designation for the improved Model 47D with a more powerful engine and a Plexiglas bubble cockpit. A total of twelve HTL-2s were built and all were delivered to the Navy in 1948. The HTL-2 on display at the Pima Air & Space Museum is the first one built.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft, 1 in
Length 41 ft, in 2 in
Height 9 ft, 2 in
Weight 2,078 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 92 mph
Service Ceiling 13,000 ft
Range 214 miles
Engines 1 Franklin O-335-5/6V4-178-B32 , 178 hp
Crew 2

Bell AH-1S Cobra

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
Arizona Army National Guard, WAATS, 1996
Designation
AH-1S
Serial Number
70-15985

Bell AH-1S Cobra

The AH-1 Cobra traces its history to 1965 when Bell Helicopter began development of the design as a private venture. The Cobra is based on the famous UH-1 Huey transport helicopter, and despite the great differences in their appearance they actually have over 80 percent of their parts in common. Production began in 1966 and the Cobra was soon in combat over Vietnam. Modernized versions of the Cobra continue in use in the U.S. Army and Marine Corps as well as with several foreign militaries.

Specifications
Wingspan 44 ft
Length 53 ft
Height 13 ft 2 in
Weight 10,000 lbs (4,536 kg) (loaded)
Max. Speed 123 knots
Service Ceiling 12,200 ft
Range 274 miles
Engines 1 Lycoming T53-L-13 turbine, 1,800 hp
Crew 2

Bell TH-13N Sioux

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
Helicopter Utility Squadron Four (HU-4), 1965
Designation
TH-13N
Serial Number
145842

Bell TH-13N Sioux

In May 1946 the Bell Model 47 became the first helicopter in the world to receive a commercial type certificate. Military interest in the type was strong and the first military versions flew in December 1946. The Model 47 was used by all branches of the U.S. military and by many foreign nations. The HTL-7 is the Navy’s trainer version of the Model 47J. The first were delivered 1958 and a total of eighteen were built. In 1962, they were re-designated as TH-13N.

Specifications
Wingspan 37 ft 2 in
Length 43 ft 4 in
Height 9 ft 4 in
Weight 2,800 lbs
Max. Speed 105 mph
Service Ceiling 13,000 ft
Range 210 miles
Engines 1 Lycoming O-435-6 with 240 horsepower
Crew 2

Bell UH-1H Iroquois

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
U.S. Army Medical Evacuation markings.
Designation
UH-1H
Serial Number
64-13895

Bell UH-1H Iroquois

The Bell UH-1 is perhaps the best-known helicopter in the world. Made famous by its use in Vietnam, versions of the “Huey” remain in both military and civil service today. Designated HU-1 by the Army and H-40 by the Air Force the first Hueys flew in 1958. In 1962, the designations were changed to UH-1. By the mid-1960s Hueys could be found in every branch of the U.S. military and were entering the civil and foreign military markets. The early models of Hueys were found to be underpowered at high altitudes or in hot conditions. This resulted in the development of the larger and higher powered UH-1D in 1961. This model continued to suffer from limited power issues that often prevented them from hovering in the hot conditions that prevailed in Vietnam. An even more powerful engine was installed resulting in the UH-1H. Many D models were eventually upgraded to H standards. Over 5,000 D and H models were built.

Specifications
Wingspan 48 ft
Length 41 ft 3/4 in
Height 14 ft 6 in
Weight 9,500 lbs
Max. Speed 127 mph
Service Ceiling 12,600 ft
Range 318 miles
Engines 1 Lycoming T53-L-13 turbo shaft, 1,400 hp
Crew 2, and 12 passengers

Bell UH-1M Iroquois

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
174th Assault Helicopter Company, Vietnam, 1966
Designation
UH-1M
Serial Number
65-09430

Bell UH-1M Iroquois

The Bell UH-1 is perhaps the best-known helicopter in the world. Made famous by its use in Vietnam, versions of the “Huey” remain in both military and civil service today. Designated HU-1 by the Army and H-40 by the Air Force the first Hueys flew in 1958. In 1962, the designations were changed to UH-1. By the mid-1960s Hueys could be found in every branch of the U.S. military and were entering the civil and foreign military markets. The UH-1B had a more powerful engine and a slightly larger cabin than the A model and was introduced in April 1960.Many B models were soon upgraded to C models with a larger and more efficient rotor system. In turn a small number of UH-1Cs were modified to UH-1M with another more powerful engine and were equipped with night vision equipment and wire-guided missiles.

Specifications
Wingspan 44 ft
Length 42 ft 7 in
Height 12 ft 7 ½ in
Weight 9,500 lbs
Max. Speed 148 mph
Service Ceiling 11,500 ft
Range 382 miles
Engines 1 Lycoming T53-L-13 turbo shaft, 1,400 hp
Crew 2, and 7 passengers

Bell UH-1F Iroquois

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB, California, 1966
Designation
UH-1F
Serial Number
63-13141

Bell UH-1F Iroquois

The Bell UH-1 is perhaps the best-known helicopter in the world. Made famous by its use in Vietnam, versions of the Huey remain in both military and civil service today. Designated HU-1 by the Army and H-40 by the Air Force the first Hueys flew in 1958. In 1962, the designations were changed to UH-1. By the mid-1960s Hueys could be found in every branch of the U.S. military and were entering the civil and foreign military markets. The F model of the UH-1 was built for the Air Force specifically to provide support for the Titan and Minuteman missile sites. It featured a new engine and gearbox system that initially gave it a new designation of XH-48A. The UH-1F now on display is the first prototype of this version of the Huey. A total of 119 UH-1Fs were built between 1964 and 1967.

Specifications
Wingspan 48 ft
Length 41 ft 5 in
Height 12 ft 6 in
Weight 9,000 lbs
Max. Speed 138 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 347 miles
Engines 1 General Electric T58-GE-3 turbo shaft, 1,272 hp
Crew 2, and 10 passengers

Bell OH-58D Kiowa Warrior

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
6th Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division, Ft. Drum, New York, 2015
Designation
OH-58D
Serial Number
93-0976

Bell OH-58D Kiowa Warrior

The Bell OH-58D Kiowa Warrior was developed from the earlier OH-58A as a part of the U.S. Army’s Helicopter Improvement Program in the early 1980s. The helicopter incorporated a more powerful engine and transmission as well as a four-bladed rotor which decreased the aircraft’s noise level while improving low level performance. The distinctive Mast Mounted Sight above the main rotor allowed the helicopter to scout for targets without rising above trees or hills. In the late 1980s improvements to the helicopter’s armament systems allowed the Kiowa to carry hellfire anti-tank missiles, unguided rockets and .50 caliber machine guns. This armed version was called the Kiowa Warrior. The Army deployed Kiowa Warriors extensively in both Iraq and Afghanistan. At least 35 were lost in combat. The OH-58D was retired from Army service in 2016.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft 4 in
Length 31 ft 2 in
Height 9 ft 6 in
Weight 3,000 pounds
Max. Speed 150 mph
Service Ceiling 19,000 ft
Range 299 miles
Engines One Allison T63-A-700 turboshaft with 317 horsepower
Crew 2

Bell P-39N Airacobra

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
110th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 1944
Designation
P-39N
Serial Number
42-18814

Bell P-39N Airacobra

The P-39 was an unusual design when it appeared in 1937. Among its many unorthodox design features are the mounting of the engine behind the pilot, the use of an automobile type door on the side of the cockpit, and tricycle landing gear. The Airacobra had good low altitude performance, but suffered badly at high altitudes. Fortunately, the aircraft is large, nose mounted 37mm cannon made it a perfect ground attack aircraft. Large numbers of P-39s were exported to the Soviet Union where they were very popular in this role. The Airacobra was never popular in American or British service, but they still served in combat during the early stages of the war while more capable types were being designed and built.

Specifications
Wingspan 34 ft in
Length 30 ft 2 in
Height 12 ft 5 in
Weight 8,300 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 385 mph
Service Ceiling 35,000 ft
Range 650 miles
Engines 1 Allison V-1710-85 V12-cylinder, 1,200 hp
Crew 1

Bell P-63E Kingcobra

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
Factory standard markings U.S. Army Air Forces, 1945
Designation
P-63E
Registration
N9003R
Serial Number
43-11727

Bell P-63E Kingcobra

The Bell P-63 Kingcobra was designed based on the company’s experience with the P-39 and while the two planes appear nearly identical they are in fact quite different and share no parts in common. The Kingcobra is significantly larger and uses an advanced laminar flow wing design similar to that of the P-51 Mustang. Originally proposed in June 1941 the first P-63 flew on December 7, 1942. The Kingcobra proved to be generally superior to the P-39 and the first aircraft were delivered to the Army Air Force in October 1943. Despite the improvement over the P-39 the P-63 was still inferior to other fighters that were in production for the Army Air Force and very few Kingcobras entered service with the U. S. military and none saw combat. The vast majority of the 3,303 were delivered to Russia through the Lend-Lease program. After the war P-63s were used by France in Vietnam and by the Honduran Air Force.

Specifications
Wingspan 39 ft 2 in
Length 32 ft 8 in
Height 12 ft 9 in
Weight 9,413 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 410 mph
Service Ceiling 39,000 ft
Range 320 miles
Engines 1 Allison V-1710-109 V12 cylinder 1,425 hp
Crew 1

Bell OH-58A Kiowa

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Bell
Markings
Ohio Army National Guard
Designation
OH-58A
Serial Number
69-16112

Bell OH-58A Kiowa

The design history of the OH-58A Kiowa begins in 1961 with Bell’s submission for an Army request for a new light scout helicopter. Bell’s design did not win that contract which went to the Hughes OH-6. Bell designers felt that the basic idea for the helicopter was sound and that it could be adapted to civilian use. The redesign needed resulted in a five passenger, turbine powered aircraft designated the Model 206A and called the Jet Ranger. Flight testing began in late 1965 and deliveries of production machines began in 1967. By the end of 1968 over 300 had been built. The success of the Jet Ranger and the rising cost of the OH-6 led the U.S. Army to order more than 2,000 Jet Rangers in 1968. Redesignated as the OH-58A the helicopters served extensively in Vietnam. The Jet Ranger and its military variants are some of the most popular helicopters ever produced.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft 4 in
Length 40 ft 11.75 in
Height 9 ft 6.5 in
Weight 3,000 lbs
Max. Speed 138 mph
Service Ceiling 19,000 ft
Range 356 miles
Engines 1, Allison T63-A-700, 317 ho
Crew Crew 2, passengers 3