Boeing B-52G Stratofortress

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
2nd Bomb Wing, 596th Bomb Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana
Designation
B-52G
Serial Number
58-0183

Boeing B-52G Stratofortress

The B-52G variant of the Stratofortress was introduced in 1958. It was the first of the “short tail” versions of the aircraft with the tail a total of 8 feet shorter than the earlier versions. Other modifications significantly reduced the weight of the aircraft and moved the rear gunner from the tail of the plane to the main crew compartment where he operated his guns by remote control. The “G” model participated in the B-52s second war in 1991 with 74 aircraft dropping a total of 36,590 bombs with a total weight of 11,742,000 pounds or 5,781 tons and participating in what were then the longest combat missions ever.

Specifications
Wingspan 185 ft
Length 160 ft 10 in
Height 40 ft 7 in
Weight 488,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 634 mph
Service Ceiling 46,000 ft
Range 7,100 miles
Engines 8 Pratt & Whitney J57-P-43WB turbojets, 13,759 lbs thrust each
Crew 6

Boeing 787 Dreamliner

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
All Nippon Airways / Boeing Flight Test, 2009
Designation
787-8
Registration
N787EX
Serial Number
ZA002

Boeing 787 Dreamliner

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is the latest in Boeing’s family of jet airliners that began with the 707 in the late 1950s. The Dreamliner incorporates a large number of technological innovations that serve to enhance the aircraft’s performance in terms of both flight and economics. The aircraft is the first large commercial aircraft to feature an airframe made almost entirely of composite materials instead of aluminum. Nearly 80% of the aircraft is made of carbon fiber composites. This, along with new advanced engines and aerodynamic innovations in the shape of the aircraft’s wings, make the 787 one of the most fuel efficient and cost effective jet airliners ever built. Flight testing on the 787 began in 2009 with the first aircraft entering service with All Nippon Airways in 2011. Boeing has received orders for over 1,000 aircraft in three major variants.

Service History

Built by Boeing Aircraft Company at Everett, Washington and delivered on December 22, 2009. This is the second prototype of the 787-8 Dreamliner to be produced. It participated along with the other prototypes in the aircraft testing and certification that lasted from late 2009 until 2011. After the testing program was completed the aircraft was placed in storage at Palmdale, California. It was donated to the Pima Air & Space Museum in 2015.

Specifications
Wingspan 197 feet 3 inches
Length 186 feet
Height 55 feet 6 inches
Weight 502,500 pounds
Max. Speed 593 miles per hour
Service Ceiling 43,000 feet
Range 7,850 miles
Engines 2 Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 high bypass turbofans with 64,000 pounds of thrust each
Crew 2 flight crew, 5-6 flight attendants, 310 passengers

Boeing 737-300

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
China Southern Airlines, 2012
Designation
737-300
Registration
B-2921
Serial Number
27286

Boeing 737-300

The Boeing 737 is the most produced jet airliner in the world with more than 7,000 built with another 3,000 on order as of mid-2012. The 737 was envisioned as a small, short range airliner to supplement the Boeing 707 and 727. Design work began in 1964 and the prototype first flew in April 1967. Two versions of the 737 were developed simultaneously the -100 and the slightly longer -200. These versions entered service with Lufthansa and United Airlines in early 1968. Since then the 737 has been built in nine different major versions with at least one more variant on the drawing board.

The 737 is in use by large and small airlines around the world. It has been estimated that over 1,000 are flying at any given moment with two more taking off or landing every five seconds. In addition to the commercial versions of the aircraft the U.S. military has used several versions of the aircraft. The T-43A was used by the USAF as a navigation trainer and transport, The C-40 is in use by both the Air Force and the Navy as a cargo and personnel transport. The latest 737 derived military aircraft is the P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare aircraft.

The 737-300 is the third version of the aircraft built. It was a major redesign of the plane featuring new high-bypass turbofan engines that reduced both noise and fuel consumption. The -300 was announced in 1981 and went into airline service with Southwest Airlines and USAir in 1984. A total of 1,113 of this version were built between 1984 and 1999 when the last one was delivered.

Specifications
Wingspan 94 feet 9 inches
Length 109 feet 7 inches
Height 36 feet 6 inches
Weight 124,500 pounds
Max. Speed 544 miles per hour
Service Ceiling 37,000 feet
Range 2,685 miles
Engines Two CFM56-3 high bypass turbofan
Crew 2 flight crew, 4 flight attendants, 121-149 passengers

Boeing KC-97G Stratofreighter

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
9th Strategic Aerospace Wing, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho
Designation
KC-97G
Serial Number
53-0151

Boeing KC-97G Stratofreighter

The Boeing C-97 was developed after a request by the U.S. Army Air Forces for a transport aircraft based on the B-29. The landing gear wings and tail from the B-29 were adapted for use with a distinctive double bubble. pressurized fuselage to create the C-97. First flown in 1945 the C-97 proved to be a very successful and versatile aircraft. Boeing modified the design slightly to create their first post-war airliner, the Boeing 377. The KC-97G is the second and most numerous factory-built tanker version of the Stratofreighter. The main distinguishing feature of the KC-97G was the addition of 700-gallon external fuel tanks under each wing

Specifications
Wingspan 141 ft 3 in
Length 110ft 4 in
Height 38 ft 3 in
Weight 142,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 340 mph
Service Ceiling 33,000 ft
Range 4,200 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major radials, 3,500 hp each
Crew 5

Boeing B-29 Superfortress

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
330th Bomb Group, K-40, “Quaker City,” “Sentimental Journey,” Guam
Designation
B-29
Serial Number
44-70016

Boeing B-29 Superfortress

The B-29 was designed as what the Army Air Forces called a “Hemisphere Defense Weapon.” The 1940 specifications called for an aircraft capable of carrying 20,000 pounds of bombs for 5,333 miles at a speed of 400 miles an hour. While it did not meet all these goals the B-29 still carried more bombs, higher, farther and faster than any other bomber of World War II. It also introduced pressurized crew compartments to military aircraft, which allowed the crews to forego the heavy and awkward cold weather flying clothes that crews of other planes, were forced to wear. Over 4,000 Super Fortresses were built and many continued to serve the U.S. Air Force into the early 1950s as bombers, reconnaissance planes, and as refueling tankers.

Specifications
Wingspan 141 ft 3 in
Length 99 ft
Height 29 ft 7 in
Weight 141,100 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 358 mph
Service Ceiling 31,850 ft
Range 4,100 miles
Engines 4 Wright R-3350-23 radial, 2,200 horsepower each
Crew 11

Boeing 727-22

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
United Airlines, 1991
Designation
727-22
Registration
N7004U
Serial Number
18296

Boeing 727-22

The 727-100 was Boeing’s first entry into the short to medium range, domestic jet airliner market. The aircraft was based on the requirements of United Airlines, Eastern Air Lines, and American Airlines. The decision to use three engines was based on the need to reduce costs over the four engined jets then in use and at the same time allow over water flights. In addition, the 727 was specifically designed to operate from short, high altitude airfields. To accomplish this feat the aircraft incorporated several new high-lift devices in the wings. The leading edge of the wing incorporates hinged “Kruger flaps” on the inboard part of the wing and moveable slats along the rest of the wing’s length. The rear flaps are of a triple slotted, rear rolling design these features greatly increase the lift available at low speeds. Between 1963 and 1981 a total of 1,831 Boeing 727s were built making it the most produced jet airliner up to that time. It held this record until 1991 when it was surpassed by the Boeing 737.

This is the fifth 727 built by Boeing at its Renton, Washington factory and was the first one delivered to a customer. It was handed over to United Airlines on October 29, 1963 and was the first 727 to make a commercial flight on March 28, 1964. It was operated by United until 1991 when it was donated to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. In February 2011 the aircraft was donated to the Pima Air and Space Museum by NASM.

Specifications
Wingspan 108 feet
Length 133 ft, 2 in
Height 34 ft
Weight 170,000 pounds
Max. Speed 632 mph
Service Ceiling 36,100 ft
Range 3,110 miles
Engines Three Pratt and Whitney JT8D-7 turbofans with 14,000 pounds of thrust
Crew 3

Boeing YC-14

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
Boeing/Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB, California, 1977
Designation
YC-14
Serial Number
72-1873

Boeing YC-14

The YC-14 was designed in the early 1970s as a possible replacement for the C-130. It and the McDonnell-Douglas YC-15 competed in U.S. Air Force tests during 1976 and 1977. While both aircraft performed well neither one was selected for production. Instead the Air Force settled on an improved version of the C-130. The YC-14 introduced several new technologies and techniques in aircraft design, the most obvious of them is the positioning of the jet engines to exhaust over the top of the wing. This and specially designed flaps allow the jet thrust to provide additional lift giving the plane a very impressive short-field performance and allowing it to land at as little as 99 miles per hour.

Specifications
Wingspan 129 ft
Length 131 ft 8 in
Height 48 ft 2 in
Weight 249,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 472 mph
Service Ceiling 30,000 ft
Range 3,000 miles
Engines 2 General Electric YF103-GE-100 turbofans, 51,000 lbs thrust
Crew 3, 150 troops

Boeing B-52D Stratofortress

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
7th Bombardment Wing, Carswell AFB, Texas, 1981
Designation
B-52D
Serial Number
55-0067

Boeing B-52D Stratofortress

As the fourth model of the B-52 built the B-52D was the second most produced version of the Stratofortress. As they were first built the “D” model was virtually identical to earlier models of the aircraft except that it lacked the reconnaissance ability of earlier B-52s and was intended purely as a bomber. In 1965, modification of B-52D aircraft began to increase their conventional bomb load. The “Big Belly” modifications resulted in the ability to carry 108 conventional bombs both internally and externally. This means that one aircraft could carry 54,000 pounds of bombs, roughly the equivalent of three World War Two B-17s. B-52s dropped thousands of tons of bombs on targets in Vietnam becoming the symbol of American air power during that war.

Specifications
Wingspan 185 ft
Length 156 ft
Height 48 ft
Weight 450,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 650 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 6,000 miles
Engines 8 Pratt & Whitney J57-P-19W turbojets, 12,100 lbs thrust each
Crew 6

Boeing NB-52A Stratofortress

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB, California, 1960s
Designation
NB-52A
Serial Number
52-0003

Boeing NB-52A Stratofortress

Designed as a long-range heavy bomber to carry nuclear weapons deep into Soviet territory has proven to be a highly adaptable and versatile aircraft. Serving as a strategic nuclear bomber, conventional heavy bomber and as a test aircraft the B-52 has flown in the U.S. Air Force for fifty years and late models of the Stratofortress are expected to serve well into the Twenty-First Century. Only three of the “A” model Stratofortresses were built and all served solely as test aircraft for both Boeing and the Air Force. The oldest B-52 in existence this is the third “A” model built.

Specifications
Wingspan 185 ft
Length 156 ft
Height 48 ft
Weight 450,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 650 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 6,000 miles
Engines 8 Pratt & Whitney J57-P-9W turbojets, 9,000 lbs thrust each
Crew 6

Boeing VC-137B

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
89th Military Airlift Wing, Andrews AFB, Maryland, 1998
Designation
VC-137B
Serial Number
58-6971

Boeing VC-137B

One of three 707-153s bought “off-the-shelf” and converted to military use, this aircraft was completed as a VC-137A by Boeing Aircraft of Seattle, Washington on April 7, 1959. On May 30, 1959 this aircraft was accepted by the U. S. Air Force, painted in Military Air Transport Service colors (white top with extensive Day-Glo orange) and markings and assigned to the 1298th Air Transport (Special Missions) Squadron at Andrews AFB, MD with a deployment to Washington National Airport in Washington, DC. In June 1961, the aircraft was assigned to the 1254th Air Transport (Special Missions) Wing, Andrews AFB.

Specifications
Wingspan 130 ft 10 in
Length 144 ft 6 in
Height 42 ft
Weight 257,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 623 mph
Service Ceiling 37,500 ft
Range 3,217 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney TF33 (JT3D-3) turbofans
Crew 18, Passengers: 40

Boeing C-97G Stratofreighter

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
International Red Cross, Biafra, 1970
Designation
C-97G
Registration
HB-ILY
Serial Number
52-2626

Boeing C-97G Stratofreighter

The Boeing C-97 was developed after a request by the U.S. Army Air Forces for a transport aircraft based on the B-29. The landing gear wings and tail from the B-29 were adapted for use with a distinctive double bubble pressurized fuselage to create the C-97. First flown in 1945 the C-97 proved to be a very successful and versatile aircraft. Boeing modified the design slightly to create their first post-war airliner, the Boeing 377. Later C-97s were modified to serve as aerial refueling tankers by the USAF. C-97s and 377s also served as the basis for the giant Super Guppy transports.

Specifications
Wingspan 141 ft 3 in
Length 110 ft 4 in
Height 38 ft 3 in
Weight 142,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 340 mph
Service Ceiling 33,000 ft
Range 4,200 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major radials, 3,500 hp each
Crew 5

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
390th Bomb Group, England, 1943
Designation
B-17G
Registration
N9323R
Serial Number
44-85828

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress

While it is not the most produced American bomber of World War II, the B-17 is perhaps the most famous. Originally designed in 1934 in response to an Army request for a multi-engine bomber the B-17 lost the contract for immediate full-scale production to the Douglas B-18. The Flying Fortress was selected for further development and a total of 13 aircraft were produced for service testing. By 1941, the B-17 was beginning to enter large-scale service and production. The B-17G was the most produced version of the Flying Fortress with 4,035 produced. It was designed in response to combat reports that indicated a need for increased forward defensive guns and the ability to fly at higher altitudes. A total of 12,677 Flying Fortresses were built during the war but by 1946 only a few hundred remained in service with the Strategic Air Command. A few more were transferred to the Navy and Coast Guard and were modified to carry large lifeboats under the fuselage. Others passed into civilian hands and became firefighters and air show performers.

Specifications
Wingspan 103 ft 9 in
Length 74 ft 4 in
Height 19 ft 1 in
Weight 65,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 287 mph
Service Ceiling 35,600 ft
Range 2,000 miles
Engines 4 Wright R-1820-97 radial, 1,200 horsepower each
Crew 10

Boeing KC-135A Stratotanker

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2004
Designation
KC-135A
Registration
N931NA
Serial Number
63-7998

Boeing KC-135A Stratotanker

Developed from the Model 367-80 airliner prototype the KC-135 and 707 are two of Boeing’s most famous products. The KC-135 was designed based on an Air Force requirement for a high speed jet tanker capable of refueling the then latest generation of jet fighters and bombers. The KC-97s then in use required the jets to fly at very low speeds while the tanker struggled to fly as fast as possible. The KC-135 allowed both the tanker and the receiver aircraft to fly comfortably in the middle of their flight envelopes rather than at the edges. The first and most numerous version of the Stratotanker is the KC-135A. More than 700 KC-135As were built between 1956 and 1965. The KC-135 has proven itself to be a very versatile aircraft with many being modified for special test programs, as airborne command posts, and as VIP transports. Modernized KC-135As remain the primary tanker aircraft for the U.S. Air Force nearly 50 years after their introduction to service.

Specifications
Wingspan 130 ft 10 in
Length 136 ft 3 in
Height 38 ft 4 in
Weight 297,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 552 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 3,000 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney J57P-59W turbojets, 13,740 lbs thrust each
Crew 4

Boeing EC-135J Stratotanker

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
9th Airborne Command and Control Squadron, Hickam AFB, Hawaii
Designation
EC-135J
Serial Number
63-8057

Boeing EC-135J Stratotanker

Developed from the Model 367-80 airliner prototype the KC-135 and 707 are two of Boeing’s most famous products. The KC-135 was designed based on an Air Force requirement for a high speed jet tanker capable of refueling the then latest generation of jet fighters and bombers. The KC-97s then in use required the jets to fly at very low speeds while the tanker struggled to fly as fast as possible. The KC-135 allowed both the tanker and the receiver aircraft to fly comfortably in the middle of their flight envelopes rather than at the edges. The EC-135B version of the Stratotanker was designed from the beginning as an airborne command post. For nearly forty years one of these aircraft was airborne at all times to provide command and control of the United States’ nuclear forces in the event of a surprise attack. The primary external differences between these aircraft and the standard tankers are the large number of communications antennae along the top of the fuselage and the addition of a refueling receptacle above the cockpit. In the mid-1960s this aircraft and two others were modified to EC-135J standards. Under the code name “Silver Dollar” they were assigned to Andrews AFB and were intended for use by the President as his airborne command post in the event of nuclear war.

Specifications
Wingspan 130 ft 10 in
Length 136 ft 3 in
Height 38 ft 4 in
Weight 297,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 552 mph
Range 3,000 miles
Engines 4 Pratt& Whitney TF-33-P-9 turbofans, 13,740 lbs. thrust each
Crew 29

Boeing PT-17 Kaydet

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
United States Army Air Forces, 1941
Designation
PT-17
Registration
N48576
Serial Number
41-8882

Boeing PT-17 Kaydet

One of the most famous aircraft of World War II the PT-17 was developed as a private venture of the Stearman Aircraft Company. Development of the aircraft began in 1934 with the first Army order for the plane coming in 1936. Stearman was actually a division of the Boeing company and the aircraft was eventually sold under the Boeing name. Every pilot in the Army Air Force during World War II flew a PT-17 at some time during their training. Thousands of them were built for the American military and for export. A great many of these found their way into civilian hands at the close of the war. Civilian uses included; pilot training, aerial crop spraying, pleasure flying, and air show performances. The Stearman remains a popular aircraft at airshows today.

Specifications
Wingspan 32 ft 2 in
Length 24 ft
Height 9 ft 2 in
Weight 2,717 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 124 mph
Service Ceiling 11,200 ft
Range 505 miles
Engines 1 Continental R-670-5 radial, 220 hp
Crew 2

Boeing KB-50J Superfortress

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
4505th Air Refueling Wing, 1959
Designation
KB-50J
Serial Number
49-0372

Boeing KB-50J Superfortress

The Boeing B-50 began as an upgrade to the highly successful B-29. However, the large number of changes made; new engines, modified wings, and a larger tail being just a few, resulted in a new designation for the aircraft. The first aircraft entered service in 1947 and eventually 370 were built. As the B-50s began to be replaced by other types of bombers the Tactical Air Command modified them for use as aerial refueling tankers. The first modifications involved removing all armament and installing extra fuel tanks in the fuselage and under the wings. Eventually, greater speed was needed to keep up with the faster fighters in use and two J-47 turbojet engines replaced the external tanks. In this form they continued to serve well into the 1960s.

Specifications
Wingspan 141 ft 3 in
Length 105 ft 1 in
Height 33 ft 7 in
Weight 179,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 367 mph
Service Ceiling 39,700 ft
Range 2,300 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney R-4360 radial engines
Crew 5

Boeing EB-47E Stratojet

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
376th Bombardment Wing, Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, 1964
Designation
EB-47E
Serial Number
53-2135

Boeing EB-47E Stratojet

The U.S. Army Air Forces issued its first requirement for a jet bomber in 1943. However, it was not until after the war, when German research on high-speed aircraft became available that the design of the B-47 was finalized. The B-47 became the first all jet bomber produced anywhere in the world. Over two thousand Stratojets were built between 1947 and 1957. During the early 1960s a number of B-47E models were converted for use as electronic intelligence gathering aircraft. Additional antennas were mounted on the aircraft and a “capsule” was installed in the aircraft’s bomb bay that carried additional equipment to monitor radar and radio signals as well as two additional crew members.

Specifications
Wingspan 116 ft
Length 109 ft 10 in
Height 27 ft 11 in
Weight 206,700 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 606 mph
Service Ceiling 40,500 ft
Range 4,000 miles
Engines 6 General Electric J47-GE-25A turbojets. 6,000 lb thrust each
Crew 5

Boeing 777-263

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Boeing
Markings
Cathay Pacific Airways, 2018
Designation
777-263
Registration
B-HNL
Serial Number
27116

Boeing 777-263

The Boeing 777 is the world’s largest twin engine long range airliner. It has a capacity of between 314 and 396 passengers, a flight crew of two and up thirteen flight attendants. The 777 was the first commercial airliner to be designed entirely with computer aided design tools. The first 777 rolled of the assembly line on April 9, 1994 and made its first flight on June 12, 1994. United Airlines was the first airline to put the 777 into use in 1995. As of 2018, a total of 1,988 airplanes had been ordered by airlines around the world, making the 777 the most successful long range twin engine airliner ever and surpassing the number of Boeing 747s built. This is the first 777 built in 1994. It flew with Boeing’s test fleet until 2000 when it was sold to Cathay Pacific Airways. It flew more than 20,000 flights for the airline until it was retired in May 2018. Boeing and Cathay Pacific donated the aircraft to the museum in September 2018.

Specifications
Wingspan 119 ft 11 in
Length 209 ft 1 in
Height 60 ft 9 in
Weight 545,000 lbs. (loaded)
Max. Speed 587 mph
Service Ceiling 43,100 ft
Range 5,240 miles
Engines Two Rolls-Royce Trent 884B-17 trubofans with 93,400 pounds of thrust each
Crew 2 pilots, 13 flight attendants, 396 passengers