Cessna T-37B Tweet

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
71st Flying Training Wing, Vance AFB, Oklahoma, 1989
Designation
T-37B
Serial Number
57-2267

Cessna T-37B Tweet

In 1952 the U.S. Air Force released a requirement for a new jet powered primary trainer. In all eight companies sent in 15 design proposals. Cessna’s design for a small twin-engine aircraft with side-by-side seating was selected for development and the first flight was made on October 12, 1954. The original production version of the T-37 was considered to be underpowered, but later versions with a new engine corrected this. Eventually all T-37A versions were upgraded to T-37B standards. The plane’s unofficial, but universally used nickname of Tweety Bird or Tweet was derived from the very high-pitched sound made by the aircraft’s jet engines. More than a dozen countries have use the T-37 for training and light attack duties and a specialized attack version the A-37 was developed for export. A total of 1,269 T-37 were built with the last one leaving the assembly line in 1967. The U.S. Air Force continues to use several hundred Tweets in their pilot training program.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft 10 in
Length 29 ft 3 in
Height 9 ft 2 in
Weight 6,800 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 425 mph
Service Ceiling 25,000 ft
Range 930 miles
Engines 2 Continental/Teledyne J69-T-25 turbojets with 1,025 pounds of thrust
Crew 2

Cessna U-3A Blue Canoe

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
100th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Davis-Monthan AFB, 1974
Designation
U-3A
Serial Number
58-2107

Cessna U-3A Blue Canoe

The U-3A is the military variant of the civilian Cessna Model 310. The 310 proved very successful in the civil market and was chosen by the Air Force in 1957 for use as a light utility transport. Initially called the L-25A approximately 160 were ordered in 1957 and 1958, a further 30 were ordered in 1960 with more powerful engines and called L-27B. The designation of these aircraft was changed in 1962 to U-3A and U-3B. The plane’s distinctive blue and white paint scheme led to the unofficial nickname Blue Canoe.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft 9 in
Length 27 ft
Height 10 ft 5 in
Weight 4,830 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 235 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 900 miles
Engines 2 Continental O-470-M, 240 horsepower each
Crew 1 and 4 passengers

Cessna 120

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
Nelson Duarte, 1987
Designation
120
Registration
NC4191N
Serial Number
13662

Cessna 120

The Cessna 120 and 140 were designed at the end of World War II to take advantage of what was hoped would be massive growth in the private pilot training industry. U.S. Government education grants to returning veterans were allowed for pilot training and Cessna hoped to grab much of the flight school market with these two modern, simple, and relatively inexpensive designs. As it turned out both aircraft were very popular and many pilots received their introduction to flight in the 140 or 120. By August of 1946, Cessna was turning out twenty-two Model 120s and Model 140s a day. Production of the Model 120 ended in 1949 with 2,171 built.

The Model 120 is a simplified version of the Model 140. Differences include the deletion of the wing flaps and rear quarter fuselage windows and a simplified interior. Otherwise the aircraft were virtually identical in construction and appearance. The Model 120 was built with a fabric-covered wing, which has been replaced with aluminum on the museum’s example.

Specifications
Wingspan 32 ft 10 in
Length 21 ft 6 in
Height 6 ft 3 in
Weight 1,450 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 123 mph
Service Ceiling 15,500 ft
Range 420 miles
Engines 1 Continental C-85-12 piston engine, 85 horsepower
Crew 2

Cessna 150L

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
Johnnie Anderson, 1983
Designation
150L
Registration
N18588
Serial Number
15073966

Cessna 150L

Designed as a follow up to the Cessna 140A as a two seat trainer the Model 150 entered production in 1958 and met with resounding success. The 150 outsold all similar aircraft throughout the 1960s and 1970s. By the late 1960s over half of all civil flight training in the United States was being done in the Model 150. The main criterion for the Model 150 was reasonable performance at a low cost. The aircraft delivered both and has remained popular both as a trainer and for pleasure flying. The L version of the Model 150 was introduced in 1971. Modifications included a longer dorsal fin to improve stability and modified landing gear that reduced weight and improved the plane’s handling on the ground. It was also Cessna’s habit to give each model year’s aircraft a different paint scheme, even if no other changes were made.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft 2 in
Length 23 ft 11 in
Height 8 ft 6 in
Weight 1,600 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 124 mph
Service Ceiling 14,000 ft
Range 733 miles
Engines 1 Continental O-200-A piston engine, 100 horsepower
Crew 2

Cessna UC-78B Bobcat

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
U.S. Navy JRC-1, Naval Air Station Alameda, 1943
Designation
UC-78B
Registration
N66794
Serial Number
42-72157

Cessna UC-78B Bobcat

Cessna introduced the Model T-50 twin engine, five-seat transport to the civil market in 1939. A year later the Army Air Force ordered a small number for testing as trainers for multi-engine pilots and designated them AT-8 and with a different engine as AT-17. The same year it was selected as a trainer for the Royal Canadian Air Force and named Crane. In 1942, the Army selected the T-50 for use as a light transport with the designation UC-78 while the Navy operated them as the JRS-1. The name Bobcat was selected in a contest run by Cessna in their factory while in Army service it got the nickname Bamboo Bomber for its wooden construction. Cessna built a total of 5,399 aircraft of the type for civil and military use.

Specifications
Wingspan 41 ft 11 in
Length 32 ft 9 in
Height 9 ft 11 in
Weight 5,700 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 200 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 750 miles
Engines 2 Jacobs R-775-9 radial engines with 245 horsepower each
Crew 2 with 3 passengers

Cessna 310A

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 1971
Designation
310A
Registration
N182Z
Serial Number
38157

Cessna 310A

The U-3A is the military variant of the civilian Cessna Model 310. The 310 proved very successful in the civil market and was chosen by the Air Force in 1957 for use as a light utility transport. Initially called the L-25A approximately 160 were ordered in 1957 and 1958, a further 30 were ordered in 1960 with more powerful engines and called L-27B. The designation of these aircraft was changed in 1962 to U-3A and U-3B.

A number of military surplus U-3 aircraft found their way into the hands of civilians and other government agencies after their military service. The Forest Service acquired this aircraft for use as a lead plane in fighting forest fires. The job of a lead plane is to fly ahead of the large fire bombers and safely direct them to their drop points.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft 9 in
Length 27 ft
Height 10 ft 5 in
Weight 4,830 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 238 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 900 miles
Engines 2 Continental O-470-M, 240 horsepower each
Crew 1 and 4 passengers

Cessna O-2A Skymaster

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Cessna
Markings
602nd Tactical Control Wing, Davis-Monthan AFB, 1977
Designation
O-2A
Registration
N37581
Serial Number
68-6901

Cessna O-2A Skymaster

The Cessna O-2A is a militarized version of Cessna’s civilian Model 337 light twin-engine business aircraft. The unusual push-pull engine layout was intended to provide the benefits of a two engine aircraft without the dangers of a conventional twin that arise when one engine fails. The first flight of the 337 in January of 1961 led to nearly two hundred civilian sales by 1965. At that time the original fixed-gear version gave way to a retractable-gear aircraft. It was this upgraded version that the U.S. Air Force selected in December 1966 to serve as a Forward Air Controller or FAC in Vietnam. Basically identical with the civil version except for the addition of four hard points on the wings for minigun and rocket pods, and the addition of windows in the lower fuselage for the observer the O-2 entered service in 1967 and proved to be very successful in Vietnam. Primarily used to direct air strikes, some Skymaster’s were also equipped with loudspeakers and special radios for psychological warfare. The O-2 remained in service with the Air Force until the late 1980s when the last of them were retired.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft
Length 29 ft 2 in
Height 9 ft 5 in
Weight 4,850 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 192 mph
Service Ceiling 17,000 ft
Range 900 miles
Engines 2 Continental IO-360-D reciprocating engines, 210 hp each
Crew 2