Douglas DSV-2C Thor-Agena B

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Designation
DSV-2C
Serial Number
59-2406

Douglas DSV-2C Thor-Agena B

The Thor is a single-stage, liquid-fueled rocket first built in 1956 as an Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile (IRBM) capable of delivering a nuclear warhead over a range of about 1,500 miles. The first successful test flight was conducted in September 1957 and approval for full-scale production and deployment followed soon after. A total of 60 Thor missiles were deployed operationally in Great Britain under the joint control of the Royal Air Force and the U.S. Air Force. The British were responsible for maintaining and launching the rockets while the nuclear warheads remained under the control of the United States. The four RAF squadrons of Thor missiles became active in 1959 and served until 1963 when the missiles were deactivated and returned to the United States. Thor missiles saw later service as satellite launch vehicles and in other military programs. The Delta series of rockets is a direct descendant of the Thor.

Specifications
Length 65 ft
Height 8 ft
Weight 110,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 11,000 mph
Service Ceiling 300 miles
Range 1,500 miles
Engines 1 Rocketdyne LR79-NA-9 liquid fuel rocket with 150,000 pounds of thrust

Douglas DC-10-10

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Orbis International, 2016
Designation
DC-10-10
Registration
N220AU
Serial Number
46501

Douglas DC-10-10

The Douglas DC-10 is a three-engine wide-body airliner. Design work began as Douglas’ entry for a U.S. Air Force contract that eventually resulted in the C-5 Galaxy. With the Air Force contract lost to Lockheed, Douglas redesigned the aircraft as a medium to long range airliner capable of seating over three hundred passengers. Several versions of the DC-10 were built. The shorter ranged “Domestic” version flew first in 1970 and entered commercial service with American and United Airlines in 1971. The longer range “International” version entered service the following year. Early in its service the DC-10 developed a bad reputation for safety after several accidents related to design defects, particularly in the aircraft’s cargo doors. As problems were identified and fixed the plane’s safety record improved and by the end of its passenger service the DC-10’s record was similar to other aircraft of its generation. The last passenger carrying DC-10 was retired in 2014 however many DC-10s and the similar MD-11 aircraft continue to fly as cargo carriers. The United States Air Force uses an aerial tanker version of the DC-10 designated as the KC-10 Extender. This particular DC-10, DC-10-10, is the second McDonnell-Douglas DC-10 to be produced. First serving as a test aircraft, the airplane would later go on to be used by several airlines. In 1992, Orbis purchased it and registered it as N220AU. After 2 years of outfitting the Orbis DC-10 took over as the world’s only Flying Eye Hospital and completed its inaugural mission to Beijing, China. Over the next 22 years, the Orbis DC-10 completed 299 missions, and visited 78 countries. The Orbis DC-10 flew its final Flying Eye Hospital mission to Trujillo, Peru in September 2015.

Specifications
Wingspan 155 ft. 4 in.
Length 170 ft. 6 in.
Height 58 ft. 1 in.
Weight 430,000 lbs
Max. Speed 610 mph
Service Ceiling 42,000 ft.
Range 3,800 miles
Engines 3 General Electric CF6-6D turbofans
Crew 3

Douglas A-20G Havoc

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
312th Bomb Group, 387th Bomb Squadron, Hollandia, Papua New Guinea, 1943
Designation
A-20G
Serial Number
43-21627

Douglas A-20G Havoc

Initial design work for the A-20 began in 1936 as a private venture of the Douglas Company to design a light attack and reconnaissance aircraft. Work was delayed by a series of major design changes that increased the size of the aircraft, gave it larger engines and focused the design as a bomber. First flown in October 1938, the aircraft attracted the interest of the French Air Force and the first orders actually came from France rather than the U.S. Army. France and Belgium briefly used the aircraft before those countries fell to the Germans. Many of the aircraft were diverted to Britain where they were operated under the names Boston and Havoc. The U.S. Army adopted the British name Havoc when they began receiving their A-20s after 1939. The A-20G was the most produced version of the Havoc and was optimized for low altitude attacks using a battery of six nose mounted machine guns and parachute equipped bombs called “parafrags.”

Specifications
Wingspan 61 ft 4 in
Length 48 ft
Height 17 ft 7 in
Weight 24,127 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 317 mph
Service Ceiling 23,700 ft
Range 2,100 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-2600-23 radials with 1,620 horsepower
Crew 2

Douglas B-26K Invader

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
56th Special Operations Wing, Nakhon Phanom Air Base, Thailand, 1968-69
Designation
B-26K
Serial Number
64-17653

Douglas B-26K Invader

The B-26K is a modified and remanufactured A-26B originally built during World War II. On Mark Engineering of California rebuilt aging Douglas B-26Bs during 1964 and 1965 for use in the Vietnam War. Due to political considerations the aircraft were called A-26A during their deployment to Thailand with the 609th Special Operations Squadron. Their duties in Vietnam primarily consisted of interdicting the flow of North Vietnamese supplies and troops down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Invaders served until 1969 when the last of them were returned to the United States.

Specifications
Wingspan 71 ft 6 in
Length 51 ft 7 in
Height 19 ft
Weight 37,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 327 mph
Service Ceiling 30,500 ft
Range 1,480 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-52W radial, 2,500 horsepower
Crew 2

Douglas A-26C Invader

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
319th Bomb Group, Okinawa, 1945
Designation
A-26C
Serial Number
43-22494

Douglas A-26C Invader

The Douglas A-26 Invader is a light attack bomber. First proposed in January 1941, the B-26 had its first flight July 10, 1942. Production delays resulted in a twenty-eight month delay from the first flight to the Invader entering combat. Over 2000 Invaders were eventually built during the last half of World War II. Two versions of the Invader were built; the A-26B was equipped with a solid nose and up to 14 machine guns in the nose and wings, the A-26C had a transparent nose to allow for a bombardier to help improve level-bombing accuracy. After World War II the A-26 was redesignated as B-26 and it was under this designation that they continued to serve through the Vietnam War.

Specifications
Wingspan 70 ft
Length 53 ft 3 in
Height 18 ft 6 in
Weight 27,600 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 355 mph
Service Ceiling 22,100 ft
Range 1,400 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-27 radial, 2,000 horsepower
Crew 3

Douglas VC-118A Liftmaster

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
1254th Air Transport (Special Missions) Wing, Andrews AFB, Maryland, 1962
Designation
VC-118A
Serial Number
53-3240

Douglas VC-118A Liftmaster

The C-118 is a militarized version of the Douglas DC-6 airliner. Just over 100 C-118s were acquired for use by the Air Force as passenger and cargo transports. The main difference between the military and civil versions is the installation of a large cargo door on the left side of the aircraft. The C-118s were used primarily as passenger aircraft and several eventually served in the Presidential fleet. This aircraft served as the official Air Force One for President Kennedy. It was the last propeller driven aircraft to be designated as the primary Presidential transport. The VC-118A was overshadowed during its service by the introduction of the first Boeing VC-137s. President Kennedy preferred to travel in the larger, faster jet aircraft and the VC-118 was used primarily for short trips to airports that were too small for the big Boeings. Once the VC-137 became the primary Presidential aircraft the VC-118 was used as a backup plane and to transport lower ranking VIPs.

Specifications
Wingspan 117 ft 6 in
Length 105 ft 7 in
Height 28 ft 8 in
Weight 107,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 380 mph
Service Ceiling 29,000 ft
Range 4,720 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-52W radials, 2,500 horsepower each
Crew 5, 24 passengers

Douglas C-124C Globemaster II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
901st Military Airlift Group, Laurence G. Hanscom AFB, 1972
Designation
C-124C
Serial Number
52-1004

Douglas C-124C Globemaster II

Development of the C-124 began in 1947. Based on the short-lived C-74 the Globemaster II was intended to give the Air Force a long-range heavy-lift capability. The largest aircraft on use by the U.S. Air Force at the time, the C-124 could carry over 200 passengers or large cargos that would not fit in any other aircraft. The Globemaster II entered service in 1950 and they remained in use well into the 1970s. The C-124C version introduced more powerful engines, weather radar and better de-iceing equipment. These changes were later refitted to earlier aircraft. A total of 447 Globemaster IIs were built.

Specifications
Wingspan 174 ft 2 in
Length 130 ft
Height 48 ft 4 in
Weight 194,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 271 mph
Service Ceiling 18,400 ft
Range 4,030 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney R-4360-63A radials, 3,800 horsepower each
Crew 8, passengers 20

Douglas AIR-2A Genie

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
87th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, K. I. Sawyer AFB, Michigan, 1985
Designation
AIR-2A
Serial Number
TE-04813

Douglas AIR-2A Genie

By the mid-1950s it was apparent that traditional fighter weapons were inadequate for intercepting modern high-speed bombers. The solution would eventually be the development of guided missiles, but at the time this technology was not advanced enough for practical use. The answer to this problem for the U.S. Air Force was the unguided Genie rocket. This relatively large rocket contained a 1.5 kiloton nuclear warhead capable of blasting a bomber to bits from 1,000 feet away. The first and only test firing of a live Genie occurred over the Yucca Flats, Nevada test range on July 19, 1957. The F-89J, F-101B and F-106A interceptors carried the Genie. It finally retired from service with the F-106s in the mid-1980s.

Specifications
Wingspan 3 ft 4 in
Length 9 ft 8 in
Weight 822 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed Mach 3.3
Range 6 miles
Engines Thiokol SR49-TC-1 solid rocket motor with 36,500 pounds of thrust

Douglas B-18B Bolo

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
25th Antisubmarine Wing, 4th Antisubmarine Squadron, Langley AAF, Virginia, July 1942
Designation
B-18B
Registration
N66267
Serial Number
38-0593

Douglas B-18B Bolo

Designed in response to a 1934 U.S. Army Air Corps requirement for a replacement for the B-10, the B-18 was based on the Douglas DC-2 airliner using similar wings, tail and engines. The Bolo entered production in 1936 and by 1940 most of the bomber squadrons in the Air Corps were equipped with B-18s. When the United States entered World War II the B-18 was obsolete as a bomber and was in the process of being replaced by the B-17, however 122 were modified with a nose mounted radar replacing the bombardier and magnetic anomaly detectors for locating submarines installed in the tail and called B-18B. These aircraft served in the Caribbean and Atlantic hunting for German submarines through 1943. Most B-18s were retired to transport duties for the remainder of the war and were then sold as surplus in 1945 and 1946.

Specifications
Wingspan 89 ft 6 in
Length 57 ft 10 in
Height 15 ft 2 in
Weight 27,673 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 215 mph
Service Ceiling 23,900 ft
Engines 2 Wright R-1820-53 radials, 850 horsepower each
Crew 6

Douglas WB-66D Destroyer

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
363rd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, Shaw AFB, South Carolina, 1969
Designation
WB-66D
Serial Number
55-0395

Douglas WB-66D Destroyer

Begun as a development of the Navy A3D Skywarrior in 1952 and bearing a superficial resemblance to the Skywarrior, the B-66 is actually a very different aircraft. The Destroyer was eventually built in several versions; bomber, photographic reconnaissance, weather reconnaissance, and electronic warfare. The WB-66 weather reconnaissance version was intended to gather weather data over battlefields and had the bomb bay replaced by a pressurized compartment for two weather equipment operators and their equipment. The WB-66D was the last version of the Destroyer built with 36 constructed between June 1957 and June 1958.

Specifications
Wingspan 74 ft 7 in
Length 75 ft 2 in
Height 23 ft 7 in
Weight 64,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 640 mph
Service Ceiling 39,200 ft
Range 2,935 miles
Engines 2 Allison J71-A-13, turbojets, 10,200 pounds thrust each

Douglas DC-7B

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
T&G Aviation Inc. Chandler, Arizona, 1985
Designation
DC-7B
Registration
N51701
Serial Number
44-701

Douglas DC-7B

Developed at the request of American Airlines the DC-7 was designed to be capable of non-stop transcontinental flights in competition to the Lockheed Super Constellation in use by TWA. The new airliner first flew in May 1953, and entered service with American Airlines in November of that year. The DC-7B is virtually identical to the earlier version of the plane with the exception of larger engine nacelles designed to hold more fuel. The DC-7 was the last of Douglas’s piston engine airliner designs that had begun with the DC-2 in the 1930s. Many DC-7s found use after the airlines with travel clubs and as fire fighting aircraft.

Specifications
Wingspan 117 ft 6 in
Length 108 ft 11 in
Height 28 ft 7 in
Weight 126,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 360 mph
Service Ceiling 27,900 ft
Range 4,920 miles
Engines 4 Wright R-3350-18DA-4 radials with 3,250 horsepower each
Crew 3 pilots, 2 flight attendants

Douglas B-23 Dragon

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Air Lease, Inc., Harvey, Louisiana, N534J, 1967-71 Great Lakes Carbon, N61Y
Designation
B-23
Registration
N534AJ
Serial Number
39-0051

Douglas B-23 Dragon

Like the B-18 the B-23 Dragon was based on a successful Douglas airliner design. This time it was the DC-3 that served as the basis for the new bomber. Designed in 1939 to replace the B-18 the Dragon was significantly faster than the earlier design and was slightly better armed as for the first time in an American bomber it was fitted with a tail gun. Despite the improvements the B-23 was still not up to the standards of bombers in use by the European powers. Only 38 Dragons were built and none of them ever entered combat. By mid-1942 all the Dragons had been relegated to training, or transport duties. However, after the war the relatively high speed of the B-23 made it very popular for conversion to executive transports and small airliners.

Specifications
Wingspan 92 ft
Length 58 ft 4 in
Height 18 ft 6 in
Weight 30,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 282 mph
Service Ceiling 31,000 ft
Range 2,750 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-2600-3 radials, 1,600 horsepower each
Crew 5

Douglas A-24B Banshee

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
U.S. Army Air Forces, 1945
Designation
A-24B
Serial Number
42-54654

Douglas A-24B Banshee

The Dauntless was slow, underpowered and had insufficient defensive armament, by late 1941, the U.S. Navy considered it obsolete, even though it had been in service for only a year. Despite this the SBD participated in every major battle of the war in the Pacific and was responsible for ending Japanese expansion in the Pacific at the Battle of Midway. First entering service in 1940 the Dauntless served with the U.S. Navy, Marines Corps, and with the Army Air Force as the A-24 as well as with several foreign militaries. The SBD was capable of maintaining stable dives of up to seventy degrees allowing very accurate bombing. The Navy planned to replace the Dauntless with the Curtiss SB2C Helldiver in 1944, but once both aircraft were in service side-by-side the SBD proved to be superior to its replacement and remained in use through the end of the war.

Specifications
Wingspan 41 ft 7 in
Length 13 ft 7 in
Height 13 ft 7 in
Weight 9,359 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 255 mph
Service Ceiling 25,530 ft
Range 1,115 miles
Engines 1 Wright R-1820-20 radial with 1,200 horsepower
Crew 2

Douglas C-133B Cargomaster

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
60th Military Airlift Wing, Travis AFB, California, 1970
Designation
C-133B
Serial Number
59-0527

Douglas C-133B Cargomaster

The C-133 was the first U.S. Air Force transport to use turbo-prop engines. The Cargomaster was designed to carry complete Inter-continental Ballistic Missiles. Later C-133s were built with clamshell rear loading doors that allowed the Titan missile to be carried in one piece rather than disassembled. The Cargomasters only served from 1957 to the early 1970s due in part to serious problems with metal fatigue in their long thin fuselages. A total of fifty C-133s were built.

Specifications
Wingspan 179 ft 8 in
Length 157 ft 6 in
Height 48 ft 3 in
Weight 275,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 331 mph
Service Ceiling 19,400 ft
Range 3,975 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney T34-P-7WA Turboprops 6,500 shp
Crew 10, 200 troops or 1 Titan ICBM

Douglas F-6A Skyray

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Douglas Aircraft Testing Division, 1961
Designation
F-6A
Serial Number
134748

Douglas F-6A Skyray

The Skyray was first proposed in 1947 as an attempt to make use of information on delta-wing designs captured from Germany at the end of World War II. Problems with engine development delayed the first flight until 1951, but the aircraft proved to be very successful. In 1953, a F4D-1 broke the world absolute speed record with an average speed of 752.944 miles-per-hour. It was also the first Navy aircraft to be capable of flying at Mach 1 in level flight. The Skyray entered operational service in 1956 and served until 1964.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft 6 in
Length 45 ft 3 in
Height 13 ft
Weight 22,008 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 722 mph
Service Ceiling 55,000 ft
Range 700 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J57 turbojet, 9,700 pounds thrust
Crew 1

Douglas C-47 Skytrain

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
94th Troop Carrier Squadron, England, June 6, 1944
Designation
C-47
Serial Number
41-7723

Douglas C-47 Skytrain

The Douglas C-47 is arguably the most successful aircraft to come out of World War II. It was designed in 1935 as the DC-3 commercial airliner. The aircraft was so far ahead of its competitors that over 400 had been built by 1940 when the U.S. Army Air Forces expressed an interest in a militarized cargo and troop transport version. The main modifications from the DC-3 version are a large cargo door on the left side of the aircraft and a strengthened floor. More than 9,500 Skytrains were built for all branches of the American military and for export. Large numbers of C-47s entered civil service after the war and as many as 1,000 of them were still flying around the world in the late 1990s.

Specifications
Wingspan 95 ft 6 in
Length 63 ft 9 in
Height 17 ft
Weight 26,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 230 mph
Service Ceiling 24,000 ft
Range 1,600 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92, 1,200 horsepower each
Crew 2, passenger 27

Douglas C-9B Skytrain II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 57 (VR-57,) U.S. Navy, North Island NAS, California
Designation
C-9B
Serial Number
164607

Douglas C-9B Skytrain II

One of the most successful twin-engine jet airliners ever the Douglas DC-9 has been in continuous production since 1965. Over time the design has evolved considerably, growing steadily longer and with increasing wingspans. The DC-9 and its descendants the MD-80 and MD-90 have been so popular that they survived the demise of McDonnell-Douglas and reemerged as the Boeing 717 in the late 1990s. The U.S. Air Force adopted the DC-9 as the C-9A Nightingale in 1967 for use as a medical evacuation aircraft. The Air Force also adopted the VC-9C as a VIP transport. The U.S. Navy adopted the C-9B for general cargo and personnel transport duties.

Specifications
Wingspan 93 ft 5 in
Length 119 ft 5 in
Height 27 ft 6 in
Weight 114,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 575 mph
Service Ceiling 37,000 ft
Range 2,070 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9A Turbofans 14,500 pounds of thrust each
Crew 2 pilots and up to 4 cabin attendants

Douglas YEA-3A Skywarrior

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Naval Air Testing Center, Patuxent River NAS, 1969
Designation
YEA-3A
Serial Number
130361

Douglas YEA-3A Skywarrior

Nicknamed “The Whale” by its crews the A-3 Skywarrior is the largest and heaviest aircraft ever designed for regular operation from an aircraft carrier. Originally designed as a strategic nuclear bomber the A-3 proved itself to be very adaptable to other uses and remained in service long after the Navy had lost its role in strategic bombing. Designing for the Skywarrior began in 1948 and the first prototype flew in 1952. In addition to the bomber version the Navy used electronic warfare and aerial tanker versions of the Skywarrior into the 1970s and a few remained in test programs as late as the 1990s. A total of six A3D-1 bombers were converted to YA3D-1Q (YEA-3A) electronic countermeasures aircraft with a pressurized crew compartment replacing the bomb bay.

Specifications
Wingspan 72 ft 6 in
Length 76 ft 4 in
Height 22 ft 9.5 in
Weight 82,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 610 mph
Service Ceiling 41,000 ft
Range 1,050 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney J-57-P-10 12,400 lbs thrust
Crew 3-4

Douglas C-117D Super Gooneybird

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Current Markings: H & MS-27 (Marine Headquarters and Maintenance Squadron), Cherry Point, NC, 1968
Designation
C-117D
Serial Number
50826

Douglas C-117D Super Gooneybird

The C-117 was based on the reliable and proven DC-3/C-47 and was originally intended for the civilian airline market. The “Super DC-3” featured a longer fuselage, redesigned tail and wings, and fully enclosed the landing gear when retracted. In 1951 the Navy evaluated the Super DC-3 and liked the increased performance and accepted the aircraft as the R4D-8. Rather than purchase new aircraft a total of 98 earlier R4Ds were converted to R4D-8 standards. In 1962, the R4D-8 was re-designated under the joint Air Force-Navy designation system as the C-117D. Super Gooneybirds continued in U.S. Navy service into the mid-1970s.

Specifications
Wingspan 90 ft
Length 67 ft 9 in
Height 18 ft 3 in
Weight 31,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 270 mph
Service Ceiling 22,500 ft
Range 2,500 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-1820-80, 1,475 horsepower each
Crew 3, 35 passengers

Douglas EA-1F Skyraider

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
VAW-33, USS America, 1967
Designation
EA-1F
Serial Number
135018

Douglas EA-1F Skyraider

The design of the Douglas Skyraider dates to 1943 when the U.S. Navy requested a single seat aircraft capable of acting as both a dive-bomber and a torpedo bomber. The prototype first flew in March 1945. The design was very well received during testing and the first aircraft entered service in 1946 as the AD-1. The Skyraider proved to be a very adaptable design and production of eight major models and thirty-seven variants continued until 1957 with 3,180 built. The basic AD-5 model appeared in 1950 as a two seat anti-submarine aircraft with a wider and slightly longer fuselage. The larger fuselage allowed more extensive modification into a four seat electronic countermeasures aircraft designated AD-5Q. In 1962, these aircraft were re-designated as EA-1F. A small number of them remained in service as late as 1979.

Specifications
Wingspan 50 ft 9 in
Length 40 ft 1 in
Height 15 ft 10 in
Weight 18,799 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 200 mph
Service Ceiling 26,000 ft
Range 1,202 miles
Engines 1 Wright R-3350-26WA radial engine, 2,700 horsepower
Crew 4

Douglas A4D-2 Skyhawk

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
VMA-214 (Marine Attack Squdron), Kaneohe Bay, Hawai’i, 1962
Designation
A4D-2
Serial Number
142928

Douglas A4D-2 Skyhawk

Design of the Skyhawk began in 1952 as a response to the increasing weight and decreasing performance of the early jet fighters. The Skyhawk was to be a lightweight, carrier based, nuclear capable, attack bomber for the U. S. Navy. The type’s first flight was on June 22, 1954 and testing quickly resulted in Navy contracts for the A4D-1 and A4D-2 versions of the plane. The Skyhawk was redesignated as the A-4 in 1962 with the A4D-2 becoming the A-4B. Skyhawks were one of the main Navy and Marine strike aircraft during the Vietnam War and flew from every American carrier. Production of the Skyhawk ended in 1979, but A-4s continued to serve with the U. S. Navy in training roles until the early 1990s.

Specifications
Wingspan 27 ft 6 in
Length 39 ft 5 in
Height 15 ft
Weight 20,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 664 mph
Service Ceiling 20,100 ft
Range 1,160 miles
Engines 1 Wright J65-W-20 turbojet, 8,400 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Douglas C-54D Skymaster

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
313th Troop Carrier Group, Fassberg AB, Germany, 1948-1949
Designation
C-54D
Serial Number
42-72488

Douglas C-54D Skymaster

The first four-engine transport in Army Air Force service the C-54 is a militarized version of the DC-4 airliner. The first 24 Skymasters had been started as airliners for United and American Airlines and were commandeered by the Army early in 1942. Additional orders for a version capable of carrying heavy cargos quickly followed. Production was moved to a new factory in Chicago. The C-54 is best known for its participation in the Berlin Airlift during 1948 and 1949. In an attempt to force the Western Allies out of Berlin the Soviet government cut off all supplies of food, medicine and fuel to the western half of Berlin. In the largest humanitarian airlift ever the United States, Britain, and France delivered over 2.3 million tons of cargo, the vast majority in C-54s, between June 26, 1948 and September 30, 1949. Known as “Operation Vittles” the airlift was the first major confrontation of the Cold War between the Western Allies and the Soviet Union.

Specifications
Wingspan 117 ft 6 in
Length 93 ft 10 in
Height 27 ft 6 in
Weight 62,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 265 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 3,900 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney R-2000-11 radials, 1,290 horsepower each
Crew 3 passengers 50

Douglas A-4C Skyhawk

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Flight Systems Inc. Mohave, California, 1974-1981
Designation
A-4C
Registration
N401FS
Serial Number
148571

Douglas A-4C Skyhawk

The A-4C version of the Skyhawk entered production in 1959 as the A4D-2N. This is the first version of the Skyhawk to be capable of all weather and night operations. It was equipped with a terrain avoidance radar, autopilot, angle of attack indication system, Low Altitude Bombing System and improved low-level ejector seat. In 1962, the A4D-2N was redesignated as the A-4C and it became the first version of the Skyhawk to be produced under the A-4 designation. Six hundred and thirty-eight A-4Cs were produced between 1959 and the end of 1962.

Specifications
Wingspan 27 ft 6 in
Length 40 ft 2 in
Height 15 ft
Weight 20,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 664 mph
Service Ceiling 20,100 ft
Range 1,160 miles
Engines 1 Wright J65-W-20 turbojet, 8,400 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Douglas TF-10B Skyknight

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Douglas
Markings
Marine Night Fighter Training Squadron 20 (VMFT(N)-20), Cherry Point MCAS, North Carolina
Designation
TF-10B
Serial Number
124629

Douglas TF-10B Skyknight

Work on the Skyknight began in 1945 with a Navy request for proposals for a two-seat jet night fighter. The prototype took to the air for the first time in March 1948 and the first production aircraft began entering service in 1950. The second version of the Skyknight designate F3D-2 was intended to use a larger Westinghouse J46 engine. However, problems with this engine an its eventual cancellation left this later version with only a slight upgraded version of the original J34 engine. Skynights served extensively in the Korean War and had more kills than any other Navy or Marine night fighter. The F3D remained in service until 1970, as a trainer and electronic warfare aircraft.

Specifications
Wingspan 50 ft
Length 45 ft 5 in
Height 16 ft 1 in
Weight 23,574 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 565 mph
Service Ceiling 38,200 ft
Range 1,540 miles
Engines 2 Westinghouse J34-WE-36 turbojets with 3,400 pounds of thrust
Crew 2