Fairchild C-119C Flying Boxcar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
Hemet Valley Flying Service, Hemet, California, “Tanker 81,” 1975
Designation
C-119C
Registration
N13743
Serial Number
49-0132

Fairchild C-119C Flying Boxcar

Developed from the C-82 Packet the Flying Boxcar was slightly larger than the C-82 and featured strengthened wings and more powerful engines to allow larger, heavier cargos to be carried. It was the primary medium cargo aircraft for the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. The C-119s were used extensively during the war to airdrop troops and supplies to United Nations forces fighting in Korea. Just over 300 C-119C were built starting in 1949. Flying Boxcars served with the U.S. Air Force in many different roles until the early 1970s and the Taiwanese Air Force used at least 30 of them until early 2001. Many surplus C-119s were converted for use as aerial fire fighters during the late 1960s and early 1970s. In addition to the tanks for fire retardant, some were also equipped with a jet engine mounted on the top of the fuselage to provide extra power while carrying heavy loads at low altitudes over forest fires.

Specifications
Wingspan 109 ft 3 in
Length 86 ft 6 in
Height 26 ft 6 in
Weight 74,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 281 mph
Service Ceiling 21,580 ft
Range 1,630 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-4360-20WA radials, 3,500 horsepower each
Crew 6

Fairchild C-119C Flying Boxcar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
907th Troop Carrier Squadron, Clinton County AFB, Ohio, 1963
Designation
C-119C
Serial Number
49-0157

Fairchild C-119C Flying Boxcar

Developed from the C-82 Packet the Flying Boxcar was slightly larger than the C-82 and featured strengthened wings and more powerful engines to allow larger, heavier cargos to be carried. It was the primary medium cargo aircraft for the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. The C-119s were used extensively during the war to airdrop troops and supplies to United Nations forces fighting in Korea. Just over 300 C-119C were built starting in 1949. Flying Boxcars served with the U.S. Air Force in many different roles until the early 1970s and the Taiwanese Air Force used at least 30 of them until early 2001.

Specifications
Wingspan 109 ft 3 in
Length 86 ft 6 in
Height 26 ft 6 in
Weight 74,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 281 mph
Service Ceiling 21,580 ft
Range 1,630 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-4360-20WA radials, 3,500 horsepower each
Crew 6, 62 troops

Fairchild A-10A Thunderbolt II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
355th Tactical Fighter Wing, 358th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, 1992
Designation
A-10A
Serial Number
75-0298

Fairchild A-10A Thunderbolt II

Called the Warthog by its pilots and ground crews the A-10 is not the prettiest aircraft ever built, but it is extremely good at its job — killing tanks. Designed around a massive 30mm rotary cannon capable of firing up to 4,200 rounds per minute and with large amounts of titanium armor around the cockpit and engines the A-10 is almost a flying tank itself. The A-10 proved its capabilities in the 1990-91 Gulf War by destroying several thousand Iraqi tanks, and other vehicles.

Specifications
Wingspan 57 ft 6 in
Length 53 ft 4 in
Height 14 ft 8 in
Weight 50,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 381 mph
Service Ceiling 30,500 ft
Range 620 miles
Engines 2 General Electric TF34-GE-100 turbofans, 9,065 lbs. thrust
Crew 1

Fairchild C-123B Provider

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
U.S. Coast Guard, Miami, Florida, 1972
Designation
C-123B
Serial Number
55-4505

Fairchild C-123B Provider

The C-123 began in 1949, as a design for an all-metal cargo glider from Chase Aircraft. It was designed from the beginning to be easily converted to a powered cargo aircraft and the first powered prototype flew in October 1949. Chase Aircraft produced five flight testing aircraft before difficulties within the company resulted in the Air Force canceling the contract with them and turning further development and production of the aircraft over to Fairchild in June 1953. A total of 302 C-123Bs were produced for the U.S. Air Force. In 1960, eight Providers were transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard. They were primarily used for logistics support, but also saw service in search and rescue operations. Two aircraft, including this one, were modified to assist in the development of the LORAN-C navigation system.

Specifications
Wingspan 110 ft
Length 75 ft 9 in
Height 34 ft 1 in
Weight 60,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 245 mph
Service Ceiling 29,000 ft
Range 1,470 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-99W radials, 2,300 horsepower each
Crew 2, 61 troops

Fairchild C-82A Packet

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
7th Geodic Squadron, 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Group, Forbes AFB, Kansas, 1949
Designation
C-82A
Registration
N6997C
Serial Number
44-23006

Fairchild C-82A Packet

Designed in 1941 in response to an Army Air Force requirement for a new cargo plane capable of ground-level loading, paratroop operations, and glider towing, the C-82 incorporated a number of innovations that have become standard in military cargo aircraft. These include rear loading doors, a high wing, and an unobstructed cargo area. The rear passenger doors allowed the easy dropping of paratroopers and the removal of the rear clamshell doors allowed the dropping of larger cargos and vehicles. The C-82 first flew in September 1944 and over 220 had been delivered when production ended in 1948.

Specifications
Wingspan 106 ft, 5 in
Length 77 ft 1 in
Height 26 ft 4 in
Weight 54,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 248 mph
Service Ceiling 21,200 ft
Range 3,875 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-85 radials, 2,100 hp each
Crew 4, 44-81 passengers

Fairchild PT-26 Cornell

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943. Displayed partially unskinned to show internal structure.
Designation
PT-26
Registration
N1270N
Serial Number
10530

Fairchild PT-26 Cornell

The Fairchild PT-26 is the third in a family of three primary trainers introduced in 1939. Designed to replace the biplane trainers then in use the single, low-winged Cornell more accurately reflected the front line fighters that cadets would later be asked to fly in combat. The PT-19 was the basic version of the Cornell while the PT-23 had the same basic airframe with a radial engine fitted. Fleet Aircraft of Canada built most PT-26s with an enclosed cockpit and other cold weather modifications for use by the Royal Canadian Air Force. Cornells served in Canada until they were phased out of service in 1947. Fairchild and Fleet built over 1,700 PT-26s.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft 11 in
Length 27 ft 8 in
Height 7 ft 9 in
Weight 2,450 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 124 mph
Service Ceiling 16,000 ft
Range 480 miles
Engines 1 Ranger L-440-3 piston engine with 200 horsepower
Crew 2

Fairchild C-123K Provider

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Fairchild
Markings
Ryan Air Attack, Hemet, California, 1989
Designation
C-123K
Registration
N3142D
Serial Number
54-0580

Fairchild C-123K Provider

The C-123 began in 1949, as a design for an all-metal cargo glider from Chase Aircraft. It was designed from the beginning to be easily converted to a powered cargo aircraft and the first powered prototype flew in October 1949. Chase Aircraft produced five flight testing aircraft before difficulties within the company resulted in the Air Force canceling the contract with them and turning further development and production of the aircraft over to Fairchild in June 1953. A total of 302 C-123Bs were produced for the U.S. Air Force. In the late 1960s, 183 Providers were converted to C-123K status by the addition of two General Electric J85 turbojet engines under the wings. These aircraft served until the early 1980s. Surplus Providers were converted to aerial fire fighters and fought forest fires throughout the Western U.S. until the early 1990s.

Specifications
Wingspan 110 ft
Length 75 ft 9 in
Height 34 ft 1 in
Weight 60,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 245 mph
Service Ceiling 29,000 ft
Range 1,470 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-99W radials, 2,300 horsepower each
Crew 2