Grumman F9F-4 Panther

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
VMF-311, Pusan, Korea, 1952
Designation
F9F-4
Serial Number
125183

Grumman F9F-4 Panther

Grumman was a latecomer to the Navy jet fighter competition since it had been focused on production of the Hellcat during World War II and on the F7F and F8F immediately following it. The first F9F did not fly until November 1947, but after some initial problems with instability the Navy found the Panther to be well worth the wait. The Panther and its swept-wing sibling the Cougar were by far the best of the Navy’s first generation jet fighters. In Korea the Panther proved itself to be quite capable in both ground attack and air-to-air combat. A Panther scored the Navy’s first jet-to-jet kill on November 9, 1950 shooting down a North Korean MiG-15. A total of five MiGs were downed by F9F pilots during the war with no Panthers lost to enemy fighters.

The F9F-4 model was slightly larger than earlier models with a taller tail and a slightly lengthened fuselage. Most of this version served with Marine Corps fighter squadrons with many of them seeing combat in Korea.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft
Length 38 ft 10 in
Height 12 ft 4 in
Weight 21,250 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 593 mph
Service Ceiling 44,600 ft
Range 1,175 miles
Engines 1 Allison J33-A-16 turbojet with 6,250 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Grumman J4F-2 Widgeon

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
NACA, Langley Field, Virginia, 1948
Designation
J4F-2
Serial Number
32976

Grumman J4F-2 Widgeon

This Widgeon was built by Grumman in Bethpage, NY and was accepted by the Navy on September 20, 1943. It served with support squadrons in Seattle, Washington and Memphis, Tennessee until 1948 when it was turned over to the Edo Corporation to be modified for testing of new seaplane hull designs. Modifications included a new landing gear design that retracts up along side the fuselage rather than into it. Painted yellow, redesignated E-175 and given the name “Petulant Porpoise” it was assigned to the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) and based at Langley Field, Virginia. The first hull shape tested was a half scale replica of the Martin XP5M-1. Over the next five years the aircraft was used to test other experimental hull designs.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft
Length 31 ft 1 in
Height 11 ft 5 in
Weight 4,525 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 153 mph
Service Ceiling 14,600 ft
Range 800 miles
Engines 2 Ranger L-440-5, 200 hp
Crew 2 and 4 passengers

Grumman OV-1C Mohawk

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
1st Infantry Division, U.S. Army, Vietnam, 1967
Designation
OV-1C
Serial Number
61-2724

Grumman OV-1C Mohawk

Specifications
Wingspan 42 ft
Length 41 ft 1 in
Height 12 ft 8 in
Weight 15,302 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 295 mph
Service Ceiling 27,450 ft
Range 1,245 miles
Engines 2 Lycoming T53-L-7 turboprops with 1,150 horsepower
Crew 2

Grumman RF-9J Cougar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
Marine Composite Reconnaissance Squadron Two, (VMCJ-2), MCAS Cherry Point, NC, 1957
Designation
RF-9J
Serial Number
144426

Grumman RF-9J Cougar

Even before the Panther entered service the Navy and Grumman were examining the possibility of creating a swept-wing version of the aircraft. The appearance of the Soviet MiG-15 over Korea spurred on the process and the prototype made its first flight in September 1951. While the Cougar retained the F9F designation of the earlier Panther it was in reality an almost entirely new design bearing only a superficial resemblance to the Panther. Initially seen as an interim design the Cougar turned out to be very adaptable and several versions and modifications were made over its lifetime. One of the more important of these is the photoreconnaissance version, the F9F-8P. This version incorporated a much larger nose housing several cameras and a fixed position refueling probe. Eventually nearly 2,000 Cougars of all types were built and some remained is service as late as 1974.

Specifications
Wingspan 34 ft 6 in
Length 44 ft 9 in
Height 12 ft 3 in
Weight 22,697 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 637 mph
Service Ceiling 41,500 ft
Range 1,045 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J48-P-8A turbojet with 7,250 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Grumman E-1B Tracer

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
VAW-307, North Island Naval Air Station, California, 1974
Designation
E-1B
Serial Number
147227

Grumman E-1B Tracer

Grumman began work on modifying the S2F Tracker into an airborne radar platform in 1955 as a company funded project. At the same time the Navy was working on a request for proposals for just such an aircraft and Grumman offered their new design as a temporary solution while the Navy finalized their requirements. After the Navy agreed work on the design continued into 1956 with several changes being made to the design. Most importantly the TF-1 Trader was adopted as the basic fuselage from which the Tracer would be modified because the Trader which was itself derived from the S2F had a wider fuselage giving more room for electronic equipment. The first WF-2 flew on March 1, 1958 and operational aircraft began arriving at active squadrons in early 1960. Initially planned as an interim design the Tracer was the Navy’s primary carrier based airborne radar aircraft until the mid-1970s. The last of the 88 Tracers built left Navy service in November 1977.

Specifications
Wingspan 72 ft 4 in
Length 45 ft 4 in
Height 16 ft 10 in
Weight 24,800 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 227 mph
Service Ceiling 15,800
Range 1,010 miles
Engines 2 Wright 1820-82A radial engines with 1,525 horsepower each
Crew 4

Grumman S2F-1 Tracker

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
Naval Air Station Grosse Ile, Michigan, 1968
Designation
S2F-1
Serial Number
136468

Grumman S2F-1 Tracker

The Grumman S2F-1 Tracker entered service with the United States Navy in February 1954 replacing Grumman Avengers and Grumman Guardians in the anti-submarine role. The Tracker was the first twin-engined aircraft to be routinely operated off of the Navy’s small Escort and Light carriers. Trackers operated from American aircraft carriers until August 1976, more than 20 years after the type was first introduced. The Tracker proved popular with the Navies of several other nations as well, including; Canada, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Peru, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Retired Trackers have been converted into fire-fighting aircraft and can be regularly seen dropping fire retardant on forest fires in the western United States.

Specifications
Wingspan 69 ft 8 in
Length 42 ft
Height 16 ft 3 in
Weight 23,470 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 272 mph
Service Ceiling 22,800 ft
Range 968 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-1820-82 radial with 1,425 horsepower each
Crew 4

Grumman F-14A Tomcat

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
Fighter Squadron 111 (VF-111), USS Kitty Hawk, 1979
Designation
F-14A
Serial Number
160684

Grumman F-14A Tomcat

Made famous by the movie “Top Gun,” the F-14 Tomcat is the last of Grumman’s “Cat” series of Naval fighters which began with the F4F Wildcat in the 1930s. The F-14 grew out of the failed attempt to turn the F-111 into a carrier-based interceptor. Design work on the Tomcat began in 1967, a full year before the F-111B was canceled. It adopted the best elements of that design including the AN/AWG-9 radar and Phoenix missile, twin engines, and a variable geometry “swing” wing and combined them into a large, twin-tailed form that became the symbol of American naval aviation from the 1970s through the first years of the Twenty-first Century. Tomcats entered service on the USS Enterprise in 1974, and flew some of the last American combat missions over Vietnam while providing air cover over Saigon during the American evacuation in April 1975. The Tomcat was retired from service in the U.S. Navy in 2006.

Specifications
Wingspan 64 ft 1 in
Length 62 ft 8 in
Height 16 ft
Weight 59,714 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,544 mph
Service Ceiling 55,000 ft
Range 2,400
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-414A turbofans with 20,900 pounds of thrust
Crew 2

Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
VMF(N)-533, MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina, 1952
Designation
F7F-3
Serial Number
80410

Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat

The Grumman Tigercat was the first twin-engine fighter to go into production for the U.S. Navy. Although it was intended for use from carriers it rarely did so as the aircraft’s weight and speed made it overly dangerous. Operated from land bases the Tigercat proved to be a very good performer. It was fast, heavily armed, very maneuverable for a two engine fighter, and easy to fly. Although the F7F first flew in 1943 it was not until August 13, 1945 that the first Tigercat fighter squadron reached Okinawa. A number of Tigercat variants were produced including the single seat day fighter, two-seat night fighter, and a single seat photo reconnaissance version. Having missed World War II by a matter of hours the F7F had to wait for the Korean War to prove its abilities. Tigercats operated successfully as night fighters, and in night ground interdiction missions. The F7F was phased out of Marine service by 1954 but several Tigercats were sold to civilians for aerial firefighting. Of the 364 Tigercats built less than 10 remain.

Specifications
Wingspan 51 ft 6 in
Length 45 ft 4 in
Height 16 ft 4 in
Weight 21,720 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 450 mph
Service Ceiling 40,700 ft
Range 1,900 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-2800-34W radials with 2,100 horsepower each
Crew 1

Grumman F-11A Tiger

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
U.S. Navy Blue Angels, Pensacola NAS, Florida, 1968
Designation
F11-A
Serial Number
141824

Grumman F-11A Tiger

Begun as a supersonic variant of the F9F Cougar the Tiger quickly evolved into an entirely new design with its own designation, F11F. The Tiger showed great early promise as a fighter, but the rapid advancement of aviation technology in the 1950s resulted in the plane’s obsolescence even before it entered service. Tigers served in front line squadrons for only four years before it was replaced by the F-8 Crusader. Tigers continued in use in training and testing programs and with the Blue Angels for several years. The last two flying Tigers were used in a program to test an inflight thrust reverser and made the last Tiger flights in 1975.

Specifications
Wingspan 31 ft 7 in
Length 46 ft 11 in
Height 13 ft 3 in
Weight 21,280 lbs
Max. Speed 753 mph
Service Ceiling 41,900 ft
Range 1,275 miles
Engines 1 Wright J65-W-18 turbojet with 10,500 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Grumman AF-2S Guardian

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
Aero Union Corporation, California, 1973
Designation
AF-2S
Registration
N9995Z
Serial Number
129233

Grumman AF-2S Guardian

Design of what would become the Guardian began in 1944 with a Navy request for a replacement for the TBF Avenger torpedo bomber. Several designs were proposed and the one that was finally chosen for testing used both a radial engine driving a propeller and a small jet engine. Delays in engine development resulted in the prototype not flying until December 23, 1946 with the entire program being cancelled the next day. However, the Navy and Grumman were reluctant to abandon all the work put into the design and a highly revised version without the jet engine was proposed for anti-submarine duties. At the time the Navy’s anti-submarine tactics involved the use of pairs of aircraft in “Hunter-Killer” teams. One aircraft carried the search radars and other equipment while the other carried weapons to attack the subs. The two versions of the Guardian were the AF-2S attacker and the AF-2W search plane. Basically identical the AF-2S had a large internal bomb bay, while the AF-2W carried a large radar dome under the fuselage. The first aircraft were delivered for testing in June 1950 and they began to enter service on the carriers in December of that year. Guardians served on Navy carriers until 1955 when the last of them were sent to reserve squadrons. The last Guardians were retired in 1957. Of the 389 Guardians built only five survived scrapping. These five were purchased for conversion for fire fighting. They flew with the Aero Union Corporation in California until 1973.

Specifications
Wingspan 60 ft
Length 43 ft 5 in
Height 13 ft 2 in
Weight 20,298 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 275 mph
Service Ceiling 22,900 ft
Range 1,140
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-46W radial with 2,300 horsepower
Crew 3

Grumman G-159 Gulfstream I

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, 2002
Designation
G-159
Registration
N4NA

Grumman G-159 Gulfstream I

As early as 1947 the Grumman Company was working on designs for a twin-engine executive transport aircraft. The concept went through several stages including conversions of existing Grumman designs and all new jet powered concepts. By 1956 they had settled on a turboprop design as the best compromise between speed and affordability. Interest in the aircraft was extremely high and a series of preorders and deposits convinced Grumman to go ahead. The aircraft that emerged on August 14, 1958 could carry up to 24 passengers over 2,000 miles at speeds in excess of 300 miles an hour. A total of 200 Gulfstream I aircraft were built between 1958 and 1969 with the vast majority going into service as corporate transports. A very few were used as airliners, but they quickly proved to be uneconomical in that role. The U.S. Navy purchased nine aircraft for training A-6 Intruder navigators while the Coast Guard purchased one aircraft as a transport. In 1963, NASA purchased five Gulfstreams for both experimental and transport use.

Specifications
Wingspan 78 ft 4 in
Length 63 ft 9 in
Height 22 ft 9 in
Weight 31,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 357 mph
Service Ceiling 36,900 ft
Range 2,500 miles
Engines 2 Rolls-Royce Dart 529-8 turboprops 2,210 hp each
Crew 2, Passengers 15

Grumman TF-9J Cougar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
Training Squadron 10 (VT-10), Pensacola Naval Air Station, Florida, 1973
Designation
TF-9J
Serial Number
147397

Grumman TF-9J Cougar

Even before the Panther entered service the Navy and Grumman were examining the possibility of creating a swept-wing version of the aircraft. The appearance of the Soviet MiG-15 over Korea spurred on the process and the prototype made its first flight in September 1951. While the Cougar retained the F9F designation of the earlier Panther it was in reality an almost entirely new design bearing only a superficial resemblance to the Panther. Initially seen as an interim design the Cougar turned out to be very adaptable and several versions and modifications were made over its lifetime. The two-seat trainer version of the Cougar included a strengthened fuselage and landing gear, longer nose and other internal changes. Ironically, the only version of the Cougar to see combat was the TF-9J trainer. The Marine Corps used several in Vietnam as Forward Air Control aircraft. Eventually nearly 2,000 Cougars of all types were built and some remained is service as late as 1974.

Specifications
Wingspan 34 ft 6 in
Length 44 ft 4 in
Height 12 ft 3 in
Weight 20,574 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 630 mph
Service Ceiling 43,000 ft
Range 600 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J48-P-8A turbojet with 7,250 pounds of thrust
Crew 2

Grumman TAF-9J Cougar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman TAF-9J Cougar
Markings
VT-23, Kingsville Naval Air Station, Texas, 1969
Designation
TAF-9J
Serial Number
141121

Grumman TAF-9J Cougar

The F9F-8 Cougar featured an enlarged wing and more fuel capacity resulting in longer range and better low-speed handling. When tactical nuclear weapons were introduced in the mid-1950s the Navy selected several F9F-8s for conversion to carry the new weapons. These aircraft were equipped with the Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) and equipment for arming the weapon and were redesignated as F9F-8B. In 1962, when the system of aircraft designations changed this was changed again to AF-9J. Eventually, some of these aircraft found their way into training units and the designation was changed once again to TAF-9J.

Specifications
Wingspan 34 ft 6 in
Length 42 ft 2 in
Height 12 ft 3 in
Weight 24,763 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 647 mph
Service Ceiling 42,000 ft
Range 1,312 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J48-P-8A turbojet with 7,250 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Grumman A-6E Intruder

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
VA-165 (Navy Attack Squadron 165), USS Kitty Hawk, 1984
Designation
A-6E
Serial Number
155713

Grumman A-6E Intruder

Designing of the A-6 began in 1957 in response to a U.S. Navy request for an aircraft to replace the Douglas Skyraider. The prototype A2F-1 Intruder flew on April 19, 1960. In 1962, the Intruder was redesignated as the A-6 under the joint Navy/Air Force designation system. Production of the A-6E version of the intruder began in December 1970, though many earlier A-6A aircraft were converted to A-6E standards. The A-6E featured up-graded targeting sensors and computers as well as new engines. Eventually the TRAM (Target Recognition Attack Multi-sensor) turret was installed in the Intruders to provide even better target recognition at night and in bad weather using infrared cameras and laser target designators.

Specifications
Wingspan 53 ft
Length 54 ft 9 in
Height 16 ft 2 in
Weight 54,393 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 644 mph
Service Ceiling 42,400 ft
Range 1,010 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney J52-P-8A turbojets, 9,300 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Grumman G-1159 Gulfstream II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, 2007
Designation
G-1159
Registration
N948NA
Serial Number
222

Grumman G-1159 Gulfstream II

The success of the Grumman Gulfstream I led to the development of an improved jet powered version in may 1965. The G-II shares the forward fuselage with it’s turboprop powered predecessor but differs with a swept wing and tail and two rear mounted jet engines. The G-II proved to be even more successful than the G-1 and over 250 were built. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration uses several G-II’s for transport and experimental flights and two of them were converted to serve as pilot trainers for the Space Shuttle. In those aircraft half of the G-II cockpit is replaced with an exact replica of the Shuttle’s cockpit and the aircraft is flown in such a way that it mimics the flight characteristics of the Shuttle.

Specifications
Wingspan 68 ft 10 in
Length 79 ft 11 in
Height 24 ft 6 in
Weight 65,500 bs (loaded)
Max. Speed 581 mph
Service Ceiling 45,000 ft
Range 4,718 miles
Engines 2 Rolls-Royce Spey 511SR Turbofans 11,400 lbs thrust each
Crew 2 Pilots, 22 Passengers

Grumman HU-16A Albatross

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Grumman
Markings
31st Air Rescue Squadron, Clark AB, Philippines ca. 1957
Designation
HU-16A
Serial Number
51-0022

Grumman HU-16A Albatross

The SA-16A Albatross was designed for the U.S. Navy in 1944 as a replacement for the Grumman JRF Goose. Initial testing in 1947 led not only to Navy orders, but also to orders from the U.S. Air Force and Coast Guard as well. All 3 services primarily used the aircraft for search-and-rescue duties as well as general maritime patrol. In the early 1960s they were redesignated as HU-16s as a part of the joint Air Force-Navy aircraft designation system. The Albatross served until well into the 1970s. Some can still be found flying in private hands.

Specifications
Wingspan 96 ft 8 in
Length 61 ft 3 in
Height 25 ft 10 in
Weight 35,700 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 236 mph
Service Ceiling 21,500 ft
Range 2,850 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-1820-76A, 1,425 hp each
Crew 4-6, up to 10 stretchers