Hawker Siddeley AV-8C Harrier

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Hawker Siddeley
Markings
VMA-513, Yuma MCAS, Yuma, Arizona, 1985
Designation
AV-8C
Serial Number
159241

Hawker Siddeley AV-8C Harrier

Developed in Great Britain by Hawker Siddeley (later part of British Aerospace) the Harrier is one of only three vertical/short takeoff and landing jets to go into full production. First placed in service by the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy the Harrier first saw combat in the 1982 Falklands War between Britain and Argentina. The United States Marine Corps first ordered the Harrier in 1969 with the first deliveries in 1971. The AV-8C designation indicates an upgrade to the original AV-8A. In the United States the McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Company produced the advanced AV-8B version of the Harrier for the USMC and foreign customers. It is the AV-8B version that the Marines took into combat during the 1990 Gulf War. The Harrier’s ability to operate from small forward air fields decreases turn around and flight times allowing the plane to spend more time over the battle lines providing close air support to the ground troops.

Specifications
Wingspan 25 ft 3 in
Length 45 ft 6 in
Height 11 ft 3 in
Weight 21,150 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 730 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 260 miles
Engines 1 -Royce F402-RR-401 Pegasus turbofan, 21,500 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Hawker Siddeley FGA.1/XV-6A Kestrel

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Hawker Siddeley
Markings
Kestrel Evaluation Squadron, RAF West Raynham, 1965
Designation
FGA.1/XV-6A
Registration
64-18264
Serial Number
XS690

Hawker Siddeley FGA.1/XV-6A Kestrel

In 1957 the Hawker Aircraft Company began private development of a vertical take off and landing (VTOL) aircraft built around the new Bristol Engine Company’s Pegasus engine. The aircraft called the P.1127 was initially built without government funding but it soon attracted the attention of the British government which funded further development.

In 1964 the service test version of the aircraft, renamed Kestrel, was ready for testing. Interest in the aircraft from both the United States and West Germany resulted in the creation of the Tri-partite Evaluation Squadron at RAF West Raynham. This squadron was made up of pilots and ground crews from the Royal Air Force, West Germany, and the United States Air Force, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Army. Beginning in March 1965 they developed operational procedures for the Kestrel including the practice of short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) that is the primary operating technique for the U.S. Marine Corps’ AV-8 Harriers. After testing was concluded in England at the end of 1965, six of the aircraft were sold to the United States which brought them to North America for further testing. At this time they were redesignated as the XV-6A and given U.S. Air Force serial numbers. At the time of this testing the U.S. military determined that it did not have a use for an aircraft like the Kestrel. However, within a few years the U.S. Marine Corps began its successful association with the Kestrel’s descendant the AV-8 Harrier.

Specifications
Wingspan 22 Feet 11 inches
Length 42 Feet 6 Inches
Height 10 Feet 9 Inches
Weight 14,500 pounds (loaded)
Max. Speed 710 Miles per Hour
Service Ceiling 55,000 Feet
Range #
Engines One Bristol Siddeley Pegasus 5 turbojet with 15,200 pounds thrust
Crew 1

Hawker Siddeley GR.3 Harrier

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Hawker Siddeley
Markings
4 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Guttersloh, West Germany, 1989
Designation
GR.3
Serial Number
XV804

Hawker Siddeley GR.3 Harrier

Developed in Great Britain by Hawker Siddeley (later part of British Aerospace) the Harrier is one of only three vertical/short takeoff and landing jets to go into full production. First placed in service by the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy the Harrier first saw combat in the 1982 Falklands War between Britain and Argentina. The GR.3 variant of the Harrier is an updated version of the earlier GR.1. The GR.3 featured a more powerful engine and improved sensors. The most noticeable change was the lengthened nose housing a laser tracker. The RAF deployed most of their Harriers to Germany as a part of their NATO commitment. The GR.3 served until the early 1990s when it was replaced by the GR.7 and GR.9 versions of the Harrier.

Specifications
Wingspan 25 ft 3 in
Length 45 ft 6 in
Height 11 ft 4 in
Weight 25,000 pounds
Max. Speed 746 mph
Service Ceiling 55,000 feet
Range 403 miles
Engines One Rolls-Royce Pegasus 11 Mk. 103 turbofan with 21,500 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Hawker Siddeley TAV-8A Harrier

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Hawker Siddeley
Markings
VMAT-203, USS Roosevelt, 1976
Designation
TAV-8A
Serial Number
159382

Hawker Siddeley TAV-8A Harrier

Developed in Great Britain by Hawker Siddeley (later part of British Aerospace) the Harrier is one of only three vertical/short takeoff and landing jets to go into full production. First placed in service by the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy the Harrier first saw combat in the 1982 Falklands War between Britain and Argentina. The United States Marine Corps first ordered the Harrier in 1969 with the first deliveries in 1971. The unique flight characteristics of the Harrier required the development of a dedicated two seat trainer version of the aircraft. In the United States this first trainer variant was designated the TAV-8A. A total of eight of the two-seat Harriers were built by BAe for the Marines in 1975 and 1976. They served until all of the surviving aircraft were replaced by the TAV-8B in 1987.

Specifications
Wingspan 25 feet 3 inches
Length 55 feet 9 inches
Height 13 feet 8 inches
Weight 21,150 lbs
Max. Speed 730 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 feet
Range 260 miles
Engines One Rolls-Royce F402-RR-103 Pegasus
Crew 2