Lockheed YO-3A Quiet Star

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1982
Designation
YO-3A
Serial Number
69-18006

Lockheed YO-3A Quiet Star

The YO-3A was designed to provide a very quiet aircraft for low-altitude, night reconnaissance flights over Vietnam. Lockheed based the plane on a Schweizer SGS 2-32 sailplane. The gliders were heavily modified to add a specially muffled engine and a slow-turning three-blade propeller. Flying at 1,000 feet and using night vision equipment the Quietstar tracked North Vietnamese troop movements without the people on the ground ever even hearing the aircraft. After their service in Vietnam YO-3As were used by NASA for studies of aircraft noise, by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries for tracking poachers, and by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Specifications
Wingspan 57 ft
Length 29 ft 4 in
Height 9 ft 1 in
Weight 3,519 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 138 mph
Service Ceiling 14,000 ft
Range 500 miles
Engines 1 Continental IO-360D six-cylinder engine with 210 horsepower
Crew 2

Lockheed C-130A Hercules

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
118th Tactical Airlift Wing, Tennessee Air National Guard, Nashville, 1989
Designation
C-130A
Serial Number
57-0457

Lockheed C-130A Hercules

The Lockheed C-130 has been in constant production since 1954 giving it the record for the longest production run of any aircraft. The Hercules, or “Herk” was designed in response to a U.S. Air Force requirement for a turboprop powered tactical transport to replace the C-119. It has proved so successful that they are now in use with every branch of the American military and have served in the militaries of more than 50 nations. A total of 231 of the initial “A” model were built. Most went to the U.S. Air Force, but twelve of them went to the Australian Air Force. The Hercules has proven to be very adaptable and many have been modified for duties other than cargo carrying. C-130s have served as heavily armed gun ships, weather research aircraft, and with commercial airlines. As of 2002 the C-130J version is in production and “Herks” will still be rolling off the assembly line well past the aircraft’s 50th anniversary.

Specifications
Wingspan 132 ft 7 in
Length 97 ft 10 in
Height 38 ft 6 in
Weight 108,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 383 mph
Service Ceiling 41,300 ft
Range 3,215 miles
Engines 4 Allison T56-A-1A turboprops with 3,750 horsepower each
Crew 5, 64 paratroops

Lockheed C-130D Hercules

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
109th Tactical Airlift Group, New York Air National Guard, Schenectady County Airport, New York, 1984
Designation
C-130D
Serial Number
57-0493

Lockheed C-130D Hercules

The “D” model of the Lockheed C-130 is a prime example of the adaptability of the Hercules. In the late 1950s the Air Force determined that there was a need for a new aircraft to support the “DEW Line” early-warning radar sites located on the far northern ice cap. Testing proved that the C-130 could be easily adapted to this job. A total of twelve ski-equipped C-130Ds were built in 1958. The ski/wheel landing gear allowed the planes to operate from either a normal runway or from ice and snow. The Hercules is the largest aircraft ever equipped with skis. The success of the C-130D in the difficult and dangerous Arctic environment led to the conversion of more “Herks” for the U.S. Navy to support the operation of the numerous research stations in Antarctica. The C-130Ds served until the mid 1980s when they were replaced by newer ski-equipped LC-130Hs.

Specifications
Wingspan 132 ft 7 in
Length 97 ft 10 in
Height 38 ft 6 in
Weight 108,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 383 mph
Service Ceiling 41,300 ft
Range 3,215 miles
Engines 4 Allison T56-A-1A turboprops 3,750 hp each
Crew 5

Lockheed S-3B Viking

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Sea Control Squadron 21 (VS-21), Naval Air Field Atsugi, Japan, 2004
Designation
S-3B
Serial Number
160604

Lockheed S-3B Viking

The Viking was designed in the late 1960s to replace the aging S-2 Tracker as the Navy’s carrier based, fixed wing anti-submarine aircraft. Incorporating the latest electronic and acoustic submarine hunting technology in an airframe powered by two highly efficient turbofan engines the S-3A greatly increased the Navy’s ability to locate and track Soviet nuclear submarines. The first Viking flew in January 1972 and so impressed the Navy that the first production contract was issued only three months later. Anti-submarine squadron 21 was the first to use the Viking operationally in 1974. The aircraft proved to be extremely safe, reliable, and versatile. In 1981, Lockheed began upgrading the existing Vikings to incorporate newer electronic systems and the ability to fire the Harpoon anti-ship missile. Eventually all anti-submarine equipment was removed and the Viking focused anti-surface warfare, strike missions, and aerial refueling duties.

Service History

Built by Lockheed Aircraft, Burbank, California and delivered to the Navy in 1978 as the 184th of 187 Vikings built. The detailed service history of this aircraft is not currently available, however a few details are known. The aircraft was assigned to Sea Control Squadron 31 (VS-31) aboard the USS Eisenhower during Operation Desert Shield. Later it was transferred to Sea Control Squadron 21 (VS-21) at Naval Air Field Atsugi, Japan and deployed aboard the USS Kitty Hawk. The striking paint scheme on this aircraft was designed in 2004 for the disestablishment of VS-21. The aircraft was placed in storage at Davis-Monthan AFB in 2005. In 2006 the National Museum of Naval Aviation placed it on loan to the Pima Air and Space Museum.

Specifications
Wingspan 68 ft 8 in
Length 53 ft 4 in
Height 22 ft 9 in
Weight 52,539 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 518 mph
Service Ceiling 40,000 ft
Range 2,645 miles
Engines 2 GE TF-34-GE-400B 9,275 lbs thrust each
Crew 4

Lockheed D-21B

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
4200th Support Squadron, Beale AFB, California, 1971
Designation
D-21B
Serial Number
90-0533

Lockheed D-21B

One of the least known members of a family of aircraft that includes the SR-71 is the D-21 reconnaissance drone. The drone was designed to be launched from the back of a modified A-12, the first version of the Blackbird. A ramjet engine that requires very high speeds in order to operate powers the D-21. Initial testing began in 1963, however it was not until March 1966. Three successful test flights were made, but on the fourth flight the drone crashed into the launch plane and one of the two crewmen was killed. The drone was redesigned and fitted with a booster rocket. In this configuration it could be launched from a pylon mounted on a B-52. Testing of this version began in 1967 and eventually several operational missions were flown. The program was canceled in 1971.

Specifications
Wingspan 19 ft 9 in
Length 42 ft 10 in
Height 7 ft
Weight 11,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 2,500+ mph
Service Ceiling 90,000 ft
Range 3,000 miles
Engines 1 Marquardt XRJ43-MA-20 ramjet 1,500 pounds thrust

Lockheed F-94C Starfire

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
354th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Oxnard AFB, California, 1953
Designation
F-94C
Serial Number
51-5623

Lockheed F-94C Starfire

The U.S. Air Force recognized in the late 1940s that it suffered from a serious lack of a modern all-weather jet interceptor to combat the threat of Soviet bombers. The search for a quick solution to the problem led to the development o the F-86D, F-102A, and the F-94. The Starfire is a highly modified development of the T-33 trainer, incorporating radar and guns. The first F-94 flew in late 1949 and large-scale deliveries to the Air Force began the next year. The F-94C version was the result of further modification of the design and featured a new wing and armament consisting entirely of unguided 2.75-inch rockets housed in the nose and in two wing mounted pods.

Specifications
Wingspan 42 ft 5 in
Length 44 ft 6 in
Height 14 ft 11 in
Weight 24,200 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 585 mph
Service Ceiling 51,400 ft
Range 1,200 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J48-P-5 turbojet 8,750 lb thrust
Crew 2

Lockheed TV-2 Shooting Star

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Marine Corps Headquarters, Flight Section, Andrews AFB, Maryland, 1975
Designation
TV-2
Serial Number
136810

Lockheed TV-2 Shooting Star

In 1947, the P-80s high accident rate caused Lockheed to design a two-seat trainer version of the P-80C to combat the problem. The T-33 Arizona Aerospace Foundation is significantly longer than the P-80 and adds wingtip fuel tanks to make up for fuel storage in the fuselage lost to the second seat. The U.S. Navy as well as the Air Force adopted the Shooting Star. In Navy service they were initially designated as the TV-2, later they were re-designated as the T-33B. They are in all ways identical to the Air Force version of the aircraft.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 10 in
Length 37 ft 9 in
Height 11 ft 8 in
Weight 12,071 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 600 mph
Service Ceiling 48,000 ft
Range 275 miles
Engines 1 Allison J33-A-35 turbojet 5,400 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Lockheed F-104D Starfighter

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
156th Tactical Fighter Group (ANG), San Juan International Airport, Puerto Rico, 1974
Designation
F-104D
Serial Number
57-1323

Lockheed F-104D Starfighter

The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter was the first operational interceptor capable of sustained speeds above Mach 2. The F-104D model is a two seat fully combat-capable trainer built for use by the U.S. Air Force’s Tactical Air Command between November 1958 and September 1959. A total of 21 were built. In order to make room for the second seat the F-104D gave up its internal gun, but was given an enhanced ground strike capability and in-flight refueling.

Specifications
Wingspan 21.94 ft
Length 54.77 ft
Height 13.49 ft
Weight 24,388 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed Mach 2
Service Ceiling 57,500 ft
Range 1,388 miles
Engines 1 General Electric J79-GE-7, 15,800 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Lockheed VC-140B Jetstar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
89th Military Airlift (Special Missions) Wing, Andrews AFB, Virginia, 1966
Designation
VC-140B
Serial Number
61-2489

Lockheed VC-140B Jetstar

In 1956 the U.S. Air Force asked the aviation industry to submit proposals for low cost jet aircraft to replace its fleet of propeller driven utility transports and twin-engine crew trainers. Lockheed saw the potential for an aircraft to meet both the military requirement and the then emerging business jet market. The result was the four-engine JetStar. Initial proposals for a two engine aircraft had to be modified for four smaller engines when larger British made engines were rejected by the Air Force. Mounting the engines on the rear fuselage reduced cabin noise and lowered the risk of foreign object damage to the engines. Most of the JetStars in military service were used for VIP transport in both the Presidential Fleet and for senior military commanders. A total of 204 JetStars were built for military and civil customers in several countries.

Specifications
Wingspan 53 ft 8 in
Length 60 ft 5 in
Height 20 ft 6 in
Weight 39,288 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 573 mph
Service Ceiling 38,000 ft
Range 2,345 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney J60-P-5 turbojets, 3,000 lbs thrust each
Crew 2, 10 passengers

Lockheed C-121A Constellation

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
7167th Special Air Missions Squadron, Wiesbaden Air Base, Germany, 1951
Designation
C-121A
Serial Number
48-0614

Lockheed C-121A Constellation

After the commercial success of the L-049 Constellation, Lockheed produced a slightly improved version designated L-749. This aircraft attracted the attention of the U.S. Air Force, which bought ten of them for long-range VIP transports and designated them VC-121A. The new transports proved to be very popular and regularly carried high-ranking Generals and Presidents.

Dwight D. Eisenhower had two different VC-121As assigned as his personal transports at different times. This aircraft was the first. It served him during his time as the SHAPE commander in the early 1950s. All of Eisenhower’s Connies were called “Columbine” after the state flower of Colorado. The second VC-121A served “Ike” when he was President of the United States. Eisenhower also used one of the larger L-1079 (VC-121E) Connies as his third “Columbine” during his second term as President.

Specifications
Wingspan 123 ft
Length 95 ft 2 in
Height 23 ft 8 in
Weight 72,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 330 mph
Service Ceiling 25,000
Range 2,400 miles
Engines 4 Wright R-3350 radials, 2,200 hp each
Crew 4, 60 passengers

Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
U.S. Air Force, Air Force Plant 2, Palmdale, California
Designation
SR-71A
Serial Number
61-7951

Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird

The last of a small family of aircraft built by Lockheed’s famous Skunk Works, the SR-71 is one of the most recognized aircraft ever built. Design of what would become the Blackbird began in 1958 with a request from the CIA for an aircraft to replace the Lockheed U-2. The aircraft the CIA got was a single seat, twin engine, delta-winged design called the A-12. Even though the other versions of the Blackbird were known publicly the existence of the A-12 remained secret until 1982. The type made its first flight from the Groom Lake, Nevada test site in April 1962. Further development resulted in three different 2 seat versions; the YF-12 interceptor, the M-12 which carried the D-21 drone, and the SR-71 strategic reconnaissance aircraft. Slightly larger than the A-12 and with a longer range the first SR-71 flew in December 1964. In total 50 aircraft in the Blackbird Family were built with 30 of them being SR-71s. It is hard to overstate the technological achievement represented by the Blackbird. It holds world speed and altitude records and is the only manned, jet-powered aircraft to routinely exceed Mach 3.

A brief list of some of the records held by the Blackbird: July 28, 1976 -World absolute speed record – 2,193 mph July 28, 1976 – World absolute record for sustained altitude – 85,069 feet September 1, 1974 – New York to London – 1 hour 55 minutes 42 seconds March 6, 1990 – Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. – 1 hour 4 minutes 20 seconds

Specifications
Wingspan 55 ft 7 in
Length 107 ft 2 in
Height 16 ft 6 in
Weight 140,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 2,193 mph (Mach)
Service Ceiling 85,000 ft +
Range 3,200 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney J-58 turbojets 34,000 lbs thrust each
Crew 2

Lockheed R5O-5 Lodestar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Designation
R5O-5
Registration
N15SA
Serial Number
12481

Lockheed R5O-5 Lodestar

The Model 18 is a slightly enlarged Model 14 Super Electra designed to compete with the Douglas DC-3. While the Lodestar was relatively successful in airline service it never quite met the expectation placed on it. In part this was due to the U.S. military impressing a large number of the aircraft into military service with the outbreak of World War II. The R5O-5 were civil aircraft impressed by the U.S. Navy and used as 14-seat transports. After the war most of these aircraft found their way back to civilian hands.

Specifications
Wingspan 65 ft 6 in
Length 49 ft 10 in
Height 11 ft 10 in
Weight 17,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 218 mph
Service Ceiling 20,400 ft
Range 1,800 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-1820-40 radial engines with 1,200 horsepower each
Crew 2, 14 passengers

Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
“Soviet Yak-12” from the movie “Jet Pilot,” 1957
Designation
T-33A
Serial Number
51-16992

Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star

The introduction of high speed jet fighters such as the F-80 to the U.S Air Force resulted in very high accident rates as pilots worked to transition from propeller driven aircraft. Lockheed lengthened the F-80’s fuselage to allow a second seat to be added and enlarged the canopy to cover both pilots. The T-33 entered service with the U.S. Air Force in 1949 and was the primary jet trainer for both the Air Force and the Navy until the early 1960s. Although it was no longer the main trainer for the military Shooting Stars continued to serve as drone controllers, utility aircraft, and proficiency trainers up until the early 1980s in the U.S. military. The T-33 was extensively exported and built under license in both Canada and Japan. Shooting Stars remain active trainers in several small air forces around the world. A number of them have found their way into civilian hands and operate as personal aircraft and for business. The Boeing Company has several that are used as chase planes for newly designed airliners such as the 787 Dreamliner and the 747-8.

This aircraft has been painted to represent one of the T-33s flown in the motion picture “Jet Pilot” starring John Wayne and Janet Leigh. In the film T-33s portrayed Soviet fighter planes and were called “Yak-12s.” The real Yak-12 is a small single engine, propeller driven, short take off and landing aircraft called “Creek” by NATO.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 10.5 in
Length 37 ft 9 in
Height 11 ft 4 in
Weight 11,965 lbs
Max. Speed 543 mph
Service Ceiling 47,500 feet
Range 1,275 miles
Engines Allison J-33-A-35 turbojet with 4,600 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Lockheed C-141B Starlifter

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
305th and 514th Air Wings, McGuire AFB, New Jersey, 2000
Designation
C-141B
Serial Number
67-0013

Lockheed C-141B Starlifter

In May 1960 the U.S. Air Force asked aircraft manufacturers to submit designs for a jet transport to replace the ageing and outdated fleet of propeller driven transports then in use. Boeing, Convair, Douglas, and Lockheed submitted proposals with the Lockheed design being selected in May 1961 as the winner. The first C-141 made its maiden flight on December 17, 1963, the 60th Anniversary of the Wright Brother’s first flight. Starlifters saw extensive service in Vietnam first flying there in 1965 only a few months after entering full service. A few C-141s were built with stronger airframes to allow them to carry the Minuteman missile. After a short time in service it was found that the C-141 ran out of room in the cargo bay before it reached its maximum carrying weight and it was decided to lengthen the aircraft by 23 feet and add aerial refueling capability. One by one the Starlifters returned to Lockheed to be cut open and have two extra fuselage sections inserted, one in front of the wing and one behind it. The newly lengthened aircraft were called C-141B. The Starlifter has continued to serve in the U.S. Air Force up to the early 2000s; however, its days of service are running out. The last of them will be gone from military service by 2006.

Specifications
Wingspan 160 ft
Length 168 ft 3 in
Height 39 ft 4 in
Weight 344,100 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 565 mph
Service Ceiling 51,700 ft
Range 3,200 miles
Engines 4 Pratt & Whitney TF-33-P-7 turbofans 21,000 pounds of thrust each
Crew 5, cargo 89,152 lbs

Lockheed AP-2H Neptune

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
VAH-21, Sangley Point, Philippine Islands and Cam Ranh Bay South Vietnam, 1968
Designation
AP-2H
Serial Number
135620

Lockheed AP-2H Neptune

Designed as a long-range anti-submarine patrol plane the Neptune first flew on May 17, 1945 and P2V-1s and -2s entered service with the U. S. Navy in March 1947. Steady technological upgrades and new orders kept the Neptune in production until April 1962. The final production version, the P2V-7 (later P-2H), began coming off the assembly line in 1954 and was the first version built with underling jet engines. The AP-2H designation was applied to four heavily modified SP-2H aircraft for a special program during the Vietnam War. This program, the Trails Roads Interdiction Multisensor (TRIM) Project was designed to use then new technologies such as FLIR (Forward Looking Infra-Red) and LLLTV (Low Light Level Television) to track and attack North Vietnamese supplies and troops along the Ho Chi Minh Trail.

Specifications
Wingspan 103 ft 10 in
Length 81 ft 7 in
Height 29 ft 4 in
Weight 75,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 345 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 2,200 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-3350-32W, 3,500 hp each
Crew 9

Lockheed T-1A Seastar

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Rhode Island, 1970
Designation
T-1A
Serial Number
144200

Lockheed T-1A Seastar

Specifications
Wingspan 42 ft 10 in
Length 38 ft 6 in
Height 13 ft 4 in
Weight 15,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 580 mph
Service Ceiling 40,000 ft
Range 970 miles
Engines 1 Allison J33-A-16A turbojet 5,400 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Lockheed L-049 Constellation

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Trans World Airlines, 1950
Designation
L-049
Registration
N90831
Serial Number
42-94549

Lockheed L-049 Constellation

The Lockheed Constellation is widely regarded as one of the best of the post-World War II piston-engine airliners. Originally designed for Trans World Airlines the first Connies were taken up by the Army Air Forces during World War II. These were returned to the airlines after the war and along with over 800 other Constellations saw service with most of the world’s major airlines.

Specifications
Wingspan 123 ft
Length 95 ft 2 in
Height 23 ft 8 in
Weight 72,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 330 mph
Service Ceiling 25,000 ft
Range 2,400 miles
Engines 4 Wright R3350-35 with 2,200 HP each
Crew 6, 44-81 passengers

Lockheed VP-3A Orion

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
CINCNAVEUR Executive Transport Detachment Sigonella, Naval Air Station Sigonella, Sicily, 1999
Designation
VP-3A
Serial Number
150511

Lockheed VP-3A Orion

The P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft was based loosely on the Lockheed L-188 Electra airliner. Development of the P-3 began in 1958 and the prototype first flew in 1961. Since then the Orion has served as the primary long-range patrol and anti-submarine aircraft for the U.S. Navy, as well as for nearly 20 other countries. The VP-3A designation indicates that the aircraft has been modified for use as a VIP transport. Modifications include passenger seating, a galley, restroom, and baggage compartments.

Specifications
Wingspan 99 ft 8 in
Length 116 ft 10 in
Height 33 ft 9 in
Weight 135,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 476 mph
Service Ceiling 28,300 ft
Range 4,765 miles
Engines 4 Allison T-56-A-10W @ 4,500 hp. each
Crew 12 (when used as an anti-submarine)

Lockheed P-80B Shooting Star

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
22nd Fighter Bomber Squadron, 36th Fighter Group, Furstenfeldbruck Air Base, Germany, 1949
Designation
P-80B
Serial Number
45-8612

Lockheed P-80B Shooting Star

Designed in 1943 and first flown in 1944 the P-80 became the first mass produced jet fighter in the inventory of the U.S. Air Force. Originally intended as a pure fighter the Shooting Star saw most of its service as a ground support aircraft. However, an F-80 was the victor in the world’s first jet on jet dogfight when one shot down a North Korean MiG-15 in November 1950. F-80s served in training and Air National Guard units until the late 1950s when the last were finally retired. A total of 1,731 F-80s were built.

The P-80 lead to the design of the T-33 trainer

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 10 in
Length 34 ft 6 in
Height 11 ft 4 in
Weight 16,856 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 580 mph
Service Ceiling 46,800 ft
Range 1,090 miles
Engines 1 Allison J33 turbojet 5,400 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Lockheed P2V Neptune

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Black Hills Aviation, Inc., Alamogordo, New Mexico, 1975
Designation
P2V
Registration
N14448
Serial Number
147957

Lockheed P2V Neptune

Design of the Neptune began during World War II to meet the U.S. Navy’s requirement for a large land-based patrol plane. The aircraft’s first flight took place in May 1945 and despite the end of the war in August development of the Neptune continued with deliveries beginning in late 1946. The P2V-7 is the last version of the Neptune produced and included the addition of two jet engines to supplement the aircraft’s pair of propellers. Many Neptunes were converted to fire fighters after their military service and some continue to operate in this role.

Specifications
Wingspan 103 ft 10 in
Length 91 ft 8 in
Height 29 ft 4 in
Weight 73,139 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 403 mph
Service Ceiling 22,000 ft
Range 3,685 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-3350-32W radial engines with 3,500 horsepower each
Crew 9

Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
363rd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, Shaw AFB, 1974
Designation
T-33A
Serial Number
53-6145

Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star

In 1947, the P-80s high accident rate caused Lockheed to design a two-seat trainer version of the P-80C to combat the problem. The T-33 is significantly longer than the P-80 and adds wingtip fuel tanks to make up for fuel storage in the fuselage lost to the second seat. The T-33 was very successful and remained in U.S. Air Force service well into the 1970s. They have been supplied to several foreign governments and some have found their way into civilian hands as well.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 10 in
Length 37 ft 9 in
Height 11 ft 8 in
Weight 12,071 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 600 mph
Service Ceiling 48,000 ft
Range 1,275 miles
Engines 1 Allison J33-A-35 turbojet 5,400 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Lockheed EC-121T Warning Star

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
79th Airborne Warning and Control Squadron, Homestead AFB, Florida, 1974
Designation
EC-121T
Serial Number
53-0554

Lockheed EC-121T Warning Star

The commercial success of the Constellation airliner led Lockheed to develop several larger versions of the aircraft. The most produced of these is the Model 1049 Super Constellation that featured a longer fuselage and more powerful engines. This version also proved to be a successful airliner and was one of the last long-range piston engine airliners to see service. Like its earlier cousins the 1049 attracted the attention of the U.S. military and served as transports and electronic warfare aircraft for both the Navy and Air Force. The RC-121D version was built for the Air Force as an airborne radar aircraft and entered service in 1953. They were upgraded several times and eventually were given the designation EC-121T in the early 1970s. The last of them left Air Force service in the late 1970s. In 1967, an EC-121 crew was responsible for the first successful airborne radar controlled interception of an enemy aircraft when they directed an Air Force fighter to a successful shoot-down of a North Vietnamese MiG-21.

Specifications
Wingspan 126 ft 2 in
Length 116 ft 2 in
Height 27 ft
Weight 145,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 290 mph
Service Ceiling 18,000 ft
Range 4,000 miles
Engines 4 Wright R3350-34 radial engines 3,400 hp each
Crew 17

Lockheed Model 10 Electra

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Lockheed
Markings
Northwest Airlines, 1936
Designation
Model 10
Registration
N4963C
Serial Number
42-56638

Lockheed Model 10 Electra

The Model 10 Electra was Lockheed’s entry into the mid 1930s airliner market. Appearing almost simultaneously with the Boeing 249 and Douglas DC-2 the Electra is slightly smaller than its competitors, but it matched the speed of the DC-2. The Model 10 has the distinction of being the first aircraft on which Lockheed’s famous designer Kelly Johnson worked. First flown in 1934 the Electra entered service first with Northwest Airlines and served successfully with many domestic and foreign airlines. Approximately 20 Electras were acquired by the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II from their civil owners and were used as personnel transports in the United States. After the war the Electras passed from major airlines into small regional and non-scheduled airlines and into use as personal and business aircraft. The Electra is probably best known as the aircraft in which Amelia Earhart vanished during her attempted around-the-world flight in 1937.

Specifications
Wingspan 55 ft
Length 38 ft 7 in
Height 10 ft 1 in
Weight 10,300 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 202 mph
Service Ceiling 19,400 ft
Range 810 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Jr. SB, 450 horsepower each
Crew 2, 10 passengers