Martin B-57E Canberra

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Martin
Markings
363rd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, Shaw AFB, South Carolina, 1970
Designation
B-57E
Serial Number
55-4274

Martin B-57E Canberra

The B-57 is one of only two major combat aircraft of foreign design adopted for use by the United States military since the end of World War II. The first British built Canberra arrived in the United States in 1951 and U.S. built aircraft began flying two years later. The B-57E version of the plane was the first aircraft in the U.S. inventory specifically built for towing aerial targets. All combat equipment was replaced with the cables and reels needed to tow the large targets used in aerial gunnery practice. The B-57E could be converted to a bomber and a number of them were converted to replace combat loses in Vietnam. Two aircraft were also converted to act as airborne relays for real-time video reconnaissance over Vietnam. While the system, code named, “Compass Site” was successful it was never deployed to Vietnam.

Specifications
Wingspan 64 ft
Length 65 ft 6 in
Height 15 ft 7 in
Weight 55,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 582 mph
Service Ceiling 48,000 ft
Range 2,300 miles
Engines 2 Wright J56-W-5 turbojets, 7,200 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Martin WB-57F Canberra

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Martin
Markings
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1975
Designation
WB-57F
Registration
N925NA
Serial Number
63-13501

Martin WB-57F Canberra

The B-57 is one of only two major combat aircraft of foreign design adopted for use by the United States military since the end of World War II. The first of the bomber variants went into service in 1954. In 1955, a major redesign of the Canberra was begun to develop a high-altitude reconnaissance version. This version called the RB-57D proved to be of limited use due to problems with the new long wing that eventually led to the grounding of the aircraft. General Dynamics designed an even larger wing that solved the problem. The RB-57Fs were rebuilt from earlier aircraft and given new serial numbers along with their new wings.

The aircraft is currently undergoing restoration of all fiberglass components.

Specifications
Wingspan 122 ft 5 in
Length 68 ft 8 in
Height 20 ft 5 in
Weight 63,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 483 mph
Service Ceiling 64,000 ft
Range 3,910 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney TF33-P-11A turbojets with 16,500 pounds of thrust
Crew 2

Martin B-26B Marauder

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Martin
Designation
B-26B
Serial Number
40-1501

Martin B-26B Marauder

Few aircraft in the history of the U.S. Army Air Force were as controversial as the Martin B-26B Marauder. Accepted for production without the benefit of a prototype the Marauder gained an early reputation as a dangerous and difficult aircraft to fly. The primary area of concern was the plane’s relatively high landing speed. Many modifications including lengthening the wings never really fixed the problem. On at least four separate occasions Congressional or military investigations were launched into whether or not production should be stopped. Despite its problems experienced crews loved the Marauder and by the end of the war it had proven itself with the lowest loss ratio of any American medium bomber.

Specifications
Wingspan 65 ft
Length 56 ft
Height 19 ft 10 in
Weight 32,020 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 315 mph
Service Ceiling 25,000 ft
Range 1,000 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engines 1,850 hp each
Crew 5

Martin PBM-5A Mariner

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Martin
Markings
Transport Squadron 21 (VR-21), ca. 1950
Designation
PBM-5A
Registration
N3190G
Serial Number
122071

Martin PBM-5A Mariner

The PBM-5A is the last version of the Mariner built for the U.S. Navy by the Martin Company. The prototype was first built in 1937 and production continued until April 1949, when the last PBM-5A was completed. They were taken out of service in 1958. Originally the PBM-3 and PBM-5 were pure “flying boats”, the -5A version of the Mariner introduced amphibious capability to the type and became the largest amphibian ever built. The PBM planes served through World War II and the Korean War as a long-range patrol bomber and rescue aircraft. Of the 1367 PBM Mariners of all models built, this is the last intact aircraft in existence. Only 36 PBM-5A’s were manufactured and 4 PBM-5S were modified as PBM-5A’s.

Specifications
Wingspan 118 ft
Length 80 ft 5/16 in
Height 29 ft 1/8 in
Weight 60,300 lbs (Maximum)
Max. Speed 200 mph
Service Ceiling 16,900 ft
Range 2,400 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-34, 2,100 horsepower each
Crew 8 to 12

Martin 404 Skyliner

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Martin
Markings
Mr. Marvin Janzen, 1975
Designation
404
Registration
N462M
Serial Number
14153

Martin 404 Skyliner

The Martin 404 is a greatly improved development of the similar appearing Martin 202. The earlier aircraft suffered from a number of problems the most serious of which was a design flaw in the wing that could cause the wings to break up in flight. The 404 corrected this error and added cabin pressurization to permit higher flights with more comfort for the passengers. The 404 first flew in 1950 and more than 100 were sold to Eastern Airlines, Trans World Airlines, the U.S. Coast Guard and one to Howard Hughes. Some of the Martin airliners remained in service into the 1980s with small airlines and private owners.

Specifications
Wingspan 93 ft 3 in
Length 74 ft 7 in
Height 28 ft 5 in
Weight 44,900 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 312 mph
Service Ceiling 29,000 ft
Range 1,080 miles
Crew 2 pilots, 1 flight attendant, 44