McDonnell ADM-20C Quail

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell
Markings
U.S. Air Force
Designation
ADM-20C

McDonnell ADM-20C Quail

The Quail decoy was designed to be released from a B-52 bomber just before it attempted to penetrate the aerial defenses of the Soviet Union. Its job was to mimic the radar signature, speed, altitude, and maneuvers of the real bomber to give it a better chance to reach its target. The Quail entered service in 1961. It remained in first line service throughout the 1960s. In 1972, Air Force testing disclosed the fact that radar operators could easily distinguish between the drone and the real aircraft by correctly identifying the drone 21 out of 23 times. The Air Force quickly switched its focus to Air Launched Cruise Missiles to keep the bombers out of harm’s way and the Quail was quickly phased out of service.

Specifications
Wingspan 5 ft 4 in
Length 12 ft 10 in
Height 3 ft 3 in
Weight 1,198 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 650 mph
Service Ceiling 55,000 ft
Range 460 miles
Engines 1 General Electric J85-GE-7 turbojet 2,450 lbs thrust

McDonnell RF-101C Voodoo

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell
Markings
186th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, Mississippi Air National Guard, Key Field, Mississippi
Designation
RF-101C
Serial Number
56-0214

McDonnell RF-101C Voodoo

The F-101 Voodoo was conceived as a long-range escort fighter for the bombers of the Strategic Air Command. As it turned out this was one of the few roles the versatile Voodoo did not perform. The F-101A first flew in 1953 and quickly began setting records for speed, distance, and altitude. The RF-101C version of the Voodoo is specially strengthened and modified to perform tactical reconnaissance missions at both high and very low altitudes.

Specifications
Wingspan 39 ft 8 in
Length 69 ft 4 in
Height 18 ft
Weight 48,113 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,012 mph
Service Ceiling 55,300 ft
Range 2,145 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney J57-P-13 turbojets 15,000 lbs thrust each
Crew 2

McDonnell FH-1 Phantom

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell
Markings
VMF-122
Designation
FH-1
Registration
N4283A
Serial Number
111768

McDonnell FH-1 Phantom

The McDonnell FH-1 Phantom was the United States Navy and Marine Corps first all jet fighter. In 1943 the Navy requested McDonnell Aircraft Company to design a carrier based jet fighter. The design and construction of the prototype took two years as the engineers worked through various performance requirements needed for carrier operations such as short take off ability and quick acceleration and deceleration. On July 21, 1946 the second prototype took off and landed several times aboard the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt. This made the Phantom the first all jet aircraft to conduct carrier operations for the US Navy. A total of 60 production Phantoms were made. Production aircraft were armed with four .50 caliber machine guns in the nose and eight 5 inch rockets under the wings. In 1947 Navy Fighter Squadron VF-17A and Marine Fighter Squadron VMF-122 received Phantoms, making them the first Navy and Marine squadrons to operate jet aircraft. Due to the rapid evolution of jet engines and aircraft design, Phantoms were retired from active service in 1949 and from the reserves in 1954 being replaced by the McDonnell F2H Banshee and the Grumman F9F Panther.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft 9 in
Length 38 ft 9 in
Height 14 ft 2 in
Weight 10,035 pounds (loaded)
Max. Speed 479 miles per hour
Service Ceiling 41,100 feet
Range 980 miles
Engines 2 Westinghouse J-30-WE-20 turbojets with 1,600 pounds of thrust each
Crew 1

McDonnell F-101B Voodoo

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell
Markings
107th Fighter-Interceptor Group, New York Air National Guard, Niagara Falls Airport, New York, 1972
Designation
F-101B
Serial Number
57-0282

McDonnell F-101B Voodoo

The F-101 Voodoo was conceived as a long-range escort fighter for the bombers of the Strategic Air Command. As it turned out this was one of the few roles the versatile Voodoo did not perform. The F-101A first flew in 1953 and quickly began setting records for speed, distance, and altitude. The success of the early Voodoos led to the decision to create a 2-seat all-weather interceptor version designated F-101B. This variant first flew in 1957 and began equipping squadrons of the Air Defense Command in 1959. The F-101B continued to fly with the Air National Guard until September 1982.

Specifications
Wingspan 39 ft 8 in
Length 67 ft 5 in
Height 18 ft
Weight 45,664 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,134 mph
Service Ceiling 54,800 ft
Range 1,930 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney J57-P-55 turbojets 16,900 lbs thrust each
Crew 2

McDonnell F2H-2P Banshee

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell
Markings
Marine Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron 2 (VMJ-2), 1958
Designation
F2H-2P
Serial Number
125690

McDonnell F2H-2P Banshee

The Banshee was developed as an enlarged version of the McDonnell FD-1 Phantom. The aircraft featured more powerful engines and greater armament than the earlier aircraft. The F2H-1 prototype first flew on January 11, 1947 and operational aircraft reached service in March 1949. By the end of 1949 the F2H-2 version of the aircraft was in service. It featured a longer fuselage and longer wings which allowed more fuel to be carried, increasing the plane’s range. The F2H-3 and F2H-4 featured an even longer fuselage and more fuel as well as a search radar making them all-weather and night capable. The F2H-2 was also modified into a photo reconnaissance version with a lengthened nose housing several cameras. The Banshee was used extensively during the Korean War as both a fighter and a reconnaissance plane. Banshees were also sold to Canada and served in the Canadian Navy from 1955 until 1962. The last Banshees left the U.S. Navy’s inventory in 1965.

Specifications
Wingspan 44 ft 10 in
Length 40 ft 2 in
Height 14 ft 6 in
Weight 22,312 lbs
Max. Speed 532 mph
Service Ceiling 44,800 feet
Range 1,475 miles
Engines Two Westinghouse J34-WE-34 turbojets with 3,250 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

McDonnell F-3B Demon

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell
Markings
Fighter Squadron 13 (VF-13), USS Shangri-La, 1963
Designation
F-3B
Serial Number
145221

McDonnell F-3B Demon

The Demon was the Navy’s first swept-wing, all-weather, missile-armed fighter. Design work on the F3H began in 1949, but delays due to engine problems resulted in the prototype not flying until 1951 and the first production aircraft did not fly until 1953. Despite the delays the plane’s Westinghouse J40 engine was very unreliable and failures resulted in several crashes. The engine was eventually replaced with an Allison J71, which cured most of the Demon’s problems. The first versions of the Demon were strictly interceptors, but the later F3H-2 model was a strike fighter that added air-to-ground capability to the design. A total of 519 Demons were built and the type remained in front-line service until the mid 1960s when they were replaced by the F-4B Phantom II.

Specifications
Wingspan 35 ft 4 in
Length 58 ft 11 in
Height 14 ft 6 in
Weight 31,145 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 643 mph
Service Ceiling 42,650 ft
Range 1,370 miles
Engines 1 Allison J71-A-2 turbojet 14,400 lbs thrust
Crew 1