Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17F Fresco C

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
Democratic Republic of Vietnam Air Force, circa 1968
Designation
MiG-17F
Serial Number
101905

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17F Fresco C

The Mig-17 is a significantly enhanced version of the MiG-15. Changes include an increase in wing sweep and other aerodynamic changes, as well as a more powerful engine, the first Soviet engine to use an afterburner. Production of the MiG-17 was begun in 1953 and a total of 10,824 were built in Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and China. The MiG-17 was the primary fighter used by North Vietnam against the United States. It proved to be highly maneuverable and the fact that it was equipped with guns gave it a significant advantage over the missile-armed F-4 Phantom. The Lim-5 is the Polish built version of the Fresco. A total of 222 were built between 1957 and 1960. They were primarily intended for close air support of ground troops.

Specifications
Wingspan 30 ft 10 in
Length 36 ft 5 in
Height 12 ft 3 in
Weight 13,858 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 702 mph
Service Ceiling 52,841 ft
Range 646 miles
Engines 1 Lis-5 turbojet 7,452 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 Fulcrum-A

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
Soviet Air Force, ca. 1990
Designation
MiG-29
Serial Number
Unknown

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 Fulcrum-A

Development of the MiG-29 began in the late 1960s to meet the Soviet Union’s requirement for a modern small tactical fighter to replace the MiG-21. The aircraft that emerged in 1977 proved to be a more than worthy successor. Flight testing was still underway in 1982 when the first production aircraft were rushed off the assembly line to match the latest generation of American fighters the F-16 and F/A-18. Like its predecessor the MiG-21 the Fulcrum was widely exported by the Soviet Union with nearly thirty countries using the export version of the MiG-29. The exported aircraft were not as capable as the ones built for Soviet use. They have a less capable radar and lack the ability to drop nuclear weapons. This aircraft was built for the Soviet Air Force and had full electronic and weapons capabilities.

Specifications
Wingspan 37 ft 4 in
Length 56 ft 10 in
Height 15 ft 6 in
Weight 39,000 lbs
Max. Speed 1,320 mph
Service Ceiling 56,000 ft
Range 1,130
Engines Two Izotov R-33D turbofans with 18,300 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17PF Fresco D

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Designation
MiG-17PF
Serial Number
634

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17PF Fresco D

The Mig-17 is a significantly enhanced version of the MiG-15. Changes include an increase in wing sweep and other aerodynamic changes, as well as a more powerful engine in the MiG-17F, the first Soviet engine to use an afterburner. The MiG-17P was the first true all weather radar equipped interceptor available to the Soviet Union. The “PF” version also incorporated the afterburning engine found in the “F” model. The Polish built aircraft carried the designation Lim-5P. Beginning in 1971, all these aircraft were rebuilt as ground attack aircraft and re-designated Lim-6M or as camera equipped Lim-6MR reconnaissance aircraft.

Specifications
Wingspan 30 ft 10 in
Length 37 ft 6 in
Height 12 ft 3 in
Weight 14,354 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 633 mph
Service Ceiling 48,125 ft
Range 675 miles
Engines 1 Lis-5 turbojet 7,452 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15UTI Fagot

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
Polish People’s Republic Air Force, circa 1960
Designation
MiG-15UTI
Serial Number
38

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15UTI Fagot

The MiG-15 came as a great surprise to the Western nations when they first encountered it during the Korean War. It was much more advanced and capable than the West had believed and proved to be more than a match for most Western fighters except for the F-86 Sabre. The MiG-15s engine was a direct copy of the British designed Rolls-Royce Nene engine, samples of which had been bought from England in 1946. The Fagot first flew in 1948. A total of 16,085 MiG-15 were built in Poland, Czechoslovakia, and China as well as in Russia. The MiG-15UTI is the two-seat trainer version of the Fagot. In Poland many of them were rebuilt from earlier single-seat fighters.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft 1 in
Length 32 ft 11 in
Height 11 ft 2 in
Weight 10,670 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 635 mph
Service Ceiling 48,000 ft
Range 875 miles
Engines 1 Lis-2 turbojet 5,291 lbs thrust
Crew 2

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21PF Fishbed D

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
Soviet Air Force, 1967
Designation
MiG-21PF
Registration
N21MF
Serial Number
2410

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21PF Fishbed D

The MiG-21 is the most widely produced and used supersonic fighter ever with over 10,000 built since 1955. The Fishbed was originally designed as a short-range interceptor to combat the B-52s and B-58s of the U.S. Air Force. The later MiG-21PF version incorporated a better radar, and slightly longer range for use as an all-weather fighter. The MiG-21, like its American counterpart the F-4 Phantom, does not have an internal gun and relies on missiles for air-to-air combat.

Specifications
Wingspan 23 ft 6 in
Length 51 ft 9 in
Height 15 ft 9 in
Weight 18,080 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,300 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 400 miles
Engines 1 Tumansky R-11F2-300 13,492 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21PF Fishbed D

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
Hungarian Air Force, 1967
Designation
MiG-21PF
Serial Number
507

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21PF Fishbed D

The MiG-21 is the most widely produced and used supersonic fighter ever with over 10,000 built since 1955. The Fishbed was originally designed as a short-range interceptor to combat the B-52s and B-58s of the U.S. Air Force. The later MiG-21PF version incorporated a better radar, and slightly longer range for use as an all-weather fighter. The MiG-21, like its American counterpart the F-4 Phantom, does not have an internal gun and relies on missiles for air-to-air combat.

Specifications
Wingspan 23 ft 6 in
Length 51 ft 9 in
Height 15 ft 9 in
Weight 18,080 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,300 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 400 miles
Engines 1 Tumansky R-11F2-300 with 13,492 lbs of thrust
Crew 1

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15BIS Fagot

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Air Force (North Korea), 1952
Designation
MiG-15BIS
Serial Number
822

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15BIS Fagot

The MiG-15 came as a great surprise to the Western nations when they first encountered it during the Korean War. It was much more advanced and capable than the West had believed and proved to be more than a match for virtually all the Western fighters except for the F-86 Sabre. The MiG-15s engine was a direct copy of the British designed Rolls-Royce Nene engine, samples of which had been bought from England in 1946. The Fagot first flew in 1948. A total of 16,085 MiG-15 were built in Poland, Czechoslovakia, and China as well as in Russia. In all 38 different countries used the aircraft.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft 1 in
Length 33 ft 1 in
Height 12 ft 2 in
Weight 11,120 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 649 mph
Service Ceiling 50,853 ft
Range 1,228 miles
Engines 1 Klimov Vk-1 turbojet 7,452 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23MLD Flogger-K

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacture
Mikoyan-Gurevich
Markings
655th IAP, Soviet Air Force, Parnu Airport, Estonia, 1991
Designation
MiG-23MLD
Serial Number
23709

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23MLD Flogger-K

The MiG-23 was the Soviet Union’s answer to American fighters such as the McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom II. Development of an aircraft to replace the MiG-21 began in the mid-1960s. The Soviet’s eventually adopted a swing-wing design similar to he American F-111 in order to take advantage of the delta wing’s high speed advantages while also improving slow speed performance and reducing take off and landing speeds and distances. The first flight of the MiG-23 came in June 1967 and the aircraft went into service with the Soviet Air Force by 1970.

Although several versions of the MiG-23 served with the Soviet Air Force and with numerous other air forces world wide it never quite lived up to its initial promise to replace the MiG-21. The final version of the aircraft the MiG-23MLD introduced in 1982 incorporated advanced avionics and radars along with aerodynamic improvements that helped keep the aircraft competitive until the MiG-29 could be brought into widespread use. The MLDs in Soviet service were all upgraded from earlier aircraft but the export versions were all newly built. In all more than 5,000 aircraft were built.

Specifications
Wingspan 45 ft 10 in
Length 56 ft 9.5 in
Height 15 ft 9.75 in
Weight 34,612 lbs
Max. Speed 1,553 mph
Service Ceiling 60,695 ft
Range 570 miles
Engines Khatchaturov R-35-300
Crew 1