North American X-15A-2 Mockup

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
U.S. Air Force/NASA, Edwards Air Force Base, 1968
Designation
X-15A-2
Serial Number
56-6671

North American X-15A-2 Mockup

The X-15 is one of the most successful aircraft of the X-Plane series of experimental aircraft. Designed in the late 1950s to explore high altitudes and high speeds the X-15 would fly 199 times and set both altitude and speed records. Eventually the X-15 flew high enough to win its pilots Astronaut wings. It also set the world’s absolute speed record by flying over six times the speed of sound.

Specifications
Wingspan 22 ft 4 in
Length 50 ft
Height 13 ft
Weight 56,130 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 4,520 mph
Service Ceiling 354,200 ft
Range 275 miles
Engines 1 Thiokol XLR99-RM-2 rocket engine 57,850 lbs thrust
Crew 1

North American P-51D Mustang

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
3rd Air Commando Group, 4th Fighter Squadron, Philippines, 1945
Designation
P-51D
Serial Number
44-63272

North American P-51D Mustang

The North American P-51 Mustang is widely considered to be the best American fighter of World War II. However, if it were not for the British Royal Air Force the Mustang would never have been built. In January 1940, the British approached several American aircraft companies with their requirements for a new fighter and required that a prototype be ready within 120 days. North American Aviation responded with the Mustang. The early versions of the aircraft proved to be underpowered at high altitudes but when it was redesigned to use the excellent Rolls-Royce Merlin engine the Mustang soon proved to be a superb fighter at all altitudes. The P-51D features a cut down rear fuselage and a bubble canopy to improve rearward visibility and six .50 caliber machine guns in the wings in place of the four guns in most earlier versions. The Mustang remained in military service in the United States Air Force until 1957 and the last combat Mustang was retired by the Dominican Air Force in 1984. Mustangs remain popular in civilian hands with nearly 100 flying in private hands and fetching prices of over two million US dollars.

Specifications
Wingspan 37 ft
Length 32 ft 3 in
Height 12ft 2 in
Weight 11,600 lbs
Max. Speed 437 mph
Service Ceiling 41,900 ft
Range 950 miles
Engines Packard V-1650-9 Merlin, 1,490 horsepower
Crew 1

North American AF-1E Fury

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
Prototype flight testing, Columbus NAS, 1956
Designation
AF-1E
Serial Number
139531

North American AF-1E Fury

The North American Fury is a navalized version of the F-86 Sabre. The FJ-4B version of the Fury was designed in 1956 specifically to provide the U.S. Navy with a nuclear strike aircraft. Equipped with the Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) computer and carrying one nuclear weapon on the inboard left wing the FJ-4B served until the early 1960s when most were phased out of service. A total of 222 FJ-4B Furies were built.

Specifications
Wingspan 39 ft 1 in
Length 36 ft 4 in
Height 13 ft 11 in
Weight 26,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 715 mph
Service Ceiling 45,000 ft
Range 2,700 miles
Engines 1 Wright J-65-W-16 turbojet, 7,700 lbs thrust
Crew 1

North American AGM-28A Hound Dog

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
U.S. Air Force, 1960s
Designation
AGM-28A
Serial Number
59-2866

North American AGM-28A Hound Dog

Concerns about the vulnerability of the B-52 to interception by Soviet defenses led to the creation of the Hound Dog missile in 1957. The cruise missile was designed to be launched from outside the range of Soviet air defenses and fly at Mach 2 at high altitude and to carry a four-megaton nuclear warhead. Each B-52 could carry two Hound Dogs on external pylons under the wings. A unique feature of the missile is that its jet engine could be used to provide extra thrust for the aircraft carrying it during takeoff, it would then be refueled from the bomber’s fuel tanks before launch. A total of 600 Hound Dogs were built. They served from 1961 to 1978.

Specifications
Wingspan 12 ft
Length 42 ft 6 in
Height 2 ft 4 in
Weight 10,140 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed Mach 2
Service Ceiling 55,000 ft
Range 710 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J52-6 turbojet 7,500 lbs thrust

North American AGM-28A Hound Dog

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
U.S. Air Force, 1960s
Designation
AGM-28A
Serial Number
60-2092

North American AGM-28A Hound Dog

Concerns about the vulnerability of the B-52 to interception by Soviet defenses led to the creation of the Hound Dog missile in 1957. The cruise missile was designed to be launched from outside the range of Soviet air defenses and fly at Mach 2 at high altitude and to carry a four-megaton nuclear warhead. Each B-52 could carry two Hound Dogs on external pylons under the wings. A unique feature of the missile is that its jet engine could be used to provide extra thrust for the aircraft carrying it during takeoff, it would then be refueled from the bomber’s fuel tanks before launch. A total of 600 Hound Dogs were built. They served from 1961 to 1978.

Specifications
Wingspan 12 ft
Length 42 ft 6 in
Height 2 ft 4 in
Weight 10,140 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed Mach 2
Service Ceiling 55,000 ft
Range 710 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J52-6 turbojet 7,500 lbs thrust

North American AT-6B Texan

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
3595th Pilot Training Wing, Luke Army Air Field, Arizona, 1942
Designation
AT-6B
Serial Number
41-17246

North American AT-6B Texan

Design of what would become North American’s most successful and long lasting program began in 1935 as a basic trainer for the Army Air Corps. Over the next few years the aircraft evolved into the famous AT-6 Texan. Several versions of the aircraft entered service between 1936 and 1939 when the version designated AT-6 first appeared. More pilots trained in the Texan than in any other single type of aircraft during World War II. The U.S. Army and the Navy as well as many foreign nations used them. Over 21,000 aircraft were built between 1935 and 1946. In 1949, the U.S. Air Force began a program to remanufacture existing T-6 airframes into the T-6G. Aircraft were brought to North American’s Downey, California plant and completely disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled with new engines, propellers, and instruments. The aircraft were all given new serial numbers and returned to serve for many more years.

Specifications
Wingspan 42 ft
Length 29 ft 6 in
Height 10 ft 10 in
Weight 5,155 lbs (loaded AT-6A)
Max. Speed 210 mph
Service Ceiling 23,200 ft
Range 770 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney R-1340-AN-1 radial 600 hp
Crew 2

North American F-107A

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
North American Aviation, Edwards AFB, California, 1956
Designation
F-107A
Serial Number
55-5118

North American F-107A

The F-107 was designed for an Air Force competition to select a new all-weather fighter-bomber. The design originated as a redesigned F-100, but it quickly became apparent that the Air Force’s request for an internal bomb bay would require an all-new design. North American’s design incorporated a unique overhead jet intake to allow for carrying weapons partially submerged in the aircraft’s belly. The first flight of the F-107 was on September 10, 1956. The F-107’s competitor for the Air Force contract was the Republic F-105. While both aircraft performed very well the decision eventually came down on the side of the F-105 primarily because it had a full internal bomb bay while the F-107 did not. After Air Force testing ended two of the F-107 prototypes were turned over to NASA for experimental testing of the control system for the X-15 and high speed research flights.

Specifications
Wingspan 36 ft 7 in
Length 60 ft 10 in
Height 19 ft 6 in
Weight 37,153 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,295 mph
Service Ceiling 53,200 ft
Range 2,428 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney YJ75-P-11 turbojet 23,500 lbs thrust
Crew 1

North American F-86L Sabre

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
354th Fighter Interceptor Squadron
Designation
F-86L
Serial Number
53-0965

North American F-86L Sabre

The Canadair Sabre is a license built version of the North American F-86. In 1948, the Royal Canadian Air Force chose the F-86 for its first jet fighter. It was decided to license the design and build them in Canada. The first aircraft built were identical to those produced in the United States but Canadair soon began making changes to the design. One of the most significant was the adoption of a different engine. The Sabre Mk. V introduced the Avro Canada Orenda engine which gave the aircraft more power and a better climb performance. Sabres served with the RCAF well into the 1960s and was exported to Germany, England, and Italy. Surplus Canadair Sabres were converted to drones for the U.S. Army and used in missile testing and several former RCAF Sabres continue to fly with private owners.

Specifications
Wingspan 39 ft 1 in
Length 40 ft 4 in
Height 15 ft
Weight 17,100 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 707 mph
Service Ceiling 54,600 ft
Range 836 miles
Engines 1 General Electric J47-GE-17 turbojet 7,630 lbs thrust
Crew 1

North American T-2C Buckeye

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
Carrier Training Wing 6 (CTW-6), Pensacola Naval Air Station, Florida
Designation
T-2C
Serial Number
157050

North American T-2C Buckeye

The Buckeye was designed in 1956 in response to a Navy requirement for a multi-purpose jet trainer. The first version of the aircraft used a single J34 jet engine and in this configuration the first flight was made in January 1958. Deliveries to training squadrons began in 1960. At the same time a program to redesign the Buckeye with two more modern jets was underway. This resulted in the T-2B, which entered Navy service in 1965. In 1969, even more efficient engines were fitted to the Buckeye resulting in the T-2C. The new General Electric J85 engine produced the same performance for significantly lower costs. The vast majority of Buckeyes have been retired from Navy service, however a few remain in use as of 2005 particularly with the Naval Test Pilot School.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 2 in
Length 38 ft 8 in
Height 14 ft 9 in
Weight 11,498 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 488 mph
Service Ceiling 40,000 ft
Range 908 miles
Engines 2 General Electric J85-GE-4 turbojets 2,950 pounds of thrust each
Crew 2

North American F-86E Sabre

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Suwon Air Base, Korea, 1952
Designation
F-86E
Serial Number
50-0600

North American F-86E Sabre

The F-86 is by far the best known of the first generation of American jet fighters. Initial design work on the F-86 began in May 1945 and resulted in the first prototype, which flew in August 1947. The Sabre was the first swept wing jet fighter to enter American service, and the first to be able to exceed Mach 1 in a dive. The Sabre made its name during the Korean War fighting against the Soviet designed MiG-15. The F-86E is an improved version of the F-86A day-fighter. The Sabre was used extensively around the world with twenty-five different countries eventually flying the aircraft. Sabres were also license built in Australia, Canada, Italy, and Japan.

Specifications
Wingspan 37 ft 1 in
Length 37 ft 6 in
Height 14 ft 5 in
Weight 13,791 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 599 mph
Service Ceiling 48,000 ft
Range 1,052 miles
Engines 1 General Electric J47-GE-13 turbojet 5,200 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

North American RA-5C Vigilante

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
Reconnaissance Attack Squadron 3 (RVAH-3), Albany Naval Air Station, Georgia, 1970
Designation
RA-5C
Serial Number
149289

North American RA-5C Vigilante

The Vigilante is one of the largest aircraft to routinely fly from the U.S. Navy’s aircraft carriers. It was designed in the late 1950s as a supersonic nuclear capable attack bomber. The Vigilante first flew in August 1958 and deliveries of operational aircraft began in 1960. The A3J, as it was then designated, featured a unique bomb bay arrangement in which the bomb was ejected out a chute that exited between the aircraft’s engines. This system proved to be very troublesome and in fact many problems were never solved. A change in policy eliminated the Navy’s strategic nuclear bombing role and the Vigilante’s mission was changed to reconnaissance. At the same time the Navy’s aircraft designation system was changed and the A3J became the A-5A and the reconnaissance version became the RA-5C. Existing Vigilantes were upgraded and modified to serve as photoreconnaissance aircraft and further examples were built in the new configuration. The Vigilante served with the U.S. Navy until 1979.

Specifications
Wingspan 53 ft
Length 76 ft 6 in
Height 19 ft 4 in
Weight 79,588 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,385 mph
Service Ceiling 48,400 ft
Range 3,000 miles
Engines 2 General Electric J79-GE-10 turbojets 10,800 lbs thrust each
Crew 2

North American BT-14A Yale

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943
Designation
BT-14A
Registration
N47350
Serial Number
3397

North American BT-14A Yale

The Yale is a member of the same family of trainer aircraft as the T-6 Texan and it bears a very close resemblance to the Texan. The most obvious difference is the fixed landing gear on the Yale compared to the retractable gear on the Texan. The 119 Yale aircraft used by the Royal Canadian Air Force were the export version of the U.S. Army Air Corps’ BT-14 and had originally been intended for France, but were diverted to Canada after France fell to Germany in 1940. The Yale served in Canada until late 1946 when they were all retired.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft 10 in
Length 28 ft 8 in
Height 11 ft 6 in
Weight 4,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 175 mph
Service Ceiling 19,000 ft
Range 750 miles
Engines 1 Wright R-975-E3 radial with 440 hp
Crew 2

North American F-100C Super Sabre

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
4510th Combat Crew Training Wing, Luke AFB, Arizona, 1968
Designation
F-100C
Serial Number
54-1823

North American F-100C Super Sabre

Developed as a fighter-bomber from the F-100A, the F-100C prototype first flew in March 1954. A long list of improvements included greatly increased fuel capacity, in-flight refueling, six hard points under the wings for carrying bombs or drop tanks, and the Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) which allowed the aircraft to carry and deliver nuclear weapons. Over four hundred and seventy “C” models were built. Super Sabres flew extensively in Vietnam and continued in Air National Guard service until 1979. Many F-100s were converted to QF-100 drones for use as remotely piloted targets.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 9 in
Length 47 ft 5 in
Height 16 ft 2.5 in
Weight 38,048 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 822 mph
Service Ceiling 39,600 ft
Range 1,150 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J57-P-21, 16,000 lbs thrust with afterburner
Crew 1

North American B-25J Mitchell

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
XI Air Force, Elmendorf Army Air Field, Alaska, 1945
Designation
B-25J
Serial Number
43-27712

North American B-25J Mitchell

The B-25 is perhaps the most successful American medium bomber of World War II. It served in every theater of the war, with all branches of the U.S. military and with several allied air forces. It is most famous as the type of aircraft flown by the Doolittle Raiders from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet in early 1942. B-25s served as both traditional bombers and as gunships with large numbers of machine guns, and in one version a 75mm cannon in the nose. The B-25J returned to the standard “glass” nose for use as a bomber. However, many were converted to a “solid” gunship nose and used for very low level attacks. The Mitchell continued to serve in the U.S. Air Force until as late as 1960 as staff transports and trainers.

Specifications
Wingspan 67 ft 7 in
Length 52 ft 11 in
Height 16 ft 4 in
Weight 35,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 272 mph
Service Ceiling 24,200 ft
Range 1,350 miles
Engines 2 Wright R-2600-92 radials, 1,700 hp each
Crew 4-6-2017

North American T-28C Trojan

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
Training Squadron 6 (VT-6), Whiting Field Naval Air Station, Florida, 1974
Designation
T-28C
Serial Number
140481

North American T-28C Trojan

The U.S. Navy introduced the T-28 in 1953, more than 3 years after it entered service with the U.S. Air Force. The Navy’s version of the aircraft, the T-28B, differed from the Air Force version primarily in having a larger engine and a 3-blade propeller instead of a 2-blade prop. The T-28C was basically identical to the B-model except that it added a tail hook usable for carrier landings. The Trojan served with the U.S. Navy until 1984.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft 1 in
Length 33 ft
Height 12 ft 8 in
Weight 8,500 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 346 mph
Service Ceiling 37,000 ft
Range 1,060 miles
Engines 1 Wright R-1820-86A radial 1,425 hp
Crew 2

North American CT-39A Sabreliner

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
1402nd Military Airlift Squadron, Shaw AFB, South Carolina
Designation
CT-39A
Serial Number
62-4449

North American CT-39A Sabreliner

In 1956 the U.S. Air Force requested proposals for a small jet trainer and transport from aircraft manufacturers. Since the government felt that the aircraft would also have commercial applications it requested that the prototypes be designed and delivered to the Air Force at no cost to the government. North American responded with the Sabreliner, which first flew in September 1958. By 1960, it had been accepted by the Air Force and had received its commercial certification. Both military and civil orders followed with a total of 599 eventually being built.

Specifications
Wingspan 44 ft 5 in
Length 43 ft 9 in
Height 16 ft
Weight 17,760 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 595 mph
Service Ceiling 39,000 ft
Range 1,950 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney J60-P-3 turbojets 3,000 lbs of thrust
Crew 2, 6 passengers

North American F-86H Sabre

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
North American
Markings
474th Fighter Bomber Wing, Clovis AFB, New Mexico, 1954
Designation
F-86H
Serial Number
53-1525

North American F-86H Sabre

The F-86H was the last of the non-radar equipped, day-fighter Sabres and was intended for use as a fighter-bomber capable of dropping nuclear weapons. Numerous changes were made to the basic F-86 design to create the H model including; an enlarged fuselage to accommodate a bigger engine, a revised canopy design, and the replacement of the standard six .50 caliber machine guns with four 20mm cannons. In the end the F-86H was the best performing version of the Sabre and could fly faster, higher, and farther than any of the other variants. Unfortunately, by the time the H model was introduced other even newer designs were doing the same things even better and the F-86H only served in front line units between 1954 and 1958. It did, however continue in service with the Air National Guard into the 1970s. Ex-Air Force F-86Hs were also used as adversary aircraft by the U.S. Navy’s Top Gun school into the late 1970s.

Specifications
Wingspan 39 ft 1 in
Length 38 ft 8 in
Height 15 ft
Weight 21,852 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 692 mph
Service Ceiling 49,000 ft
Range 1,040 miles
Engines 1 General Electric J73-GE-3E turbojet 8,920 lbs thrust
Crew 1