Republic P-47D Thunderbolt

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Republic
Markings
348th Fighter Group, 341st Fighter Squadron, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, 1943
Designation
P-47D
Serial Number
42-8130

Republic P-47D Thunderbolt

The P-47 Thunderbolt was one of the most successful American fighters of World War II. The initial concept for the Thunderbolt was a lightweight interceptor, the aircraft that eventually came out of the Republic factories was the largest and heaviest single-seat fighter ever accepted by the Army Air Forces. The Thunderbolt made its debut as a long-range escort fighter, but the plane really made its name as a fighter-bomber. The P-47s heavy armor and eight machine gun armament made it perfect for strafing and rocket attacks near the front lines. The P-47D is the most built version of the Thunderbolt with over 12,000 constructed. Unusually, the P-47D underwent a major design change mid-way through the production run without a corresponding change in the letter designation. The early D models had a high rear deck that came up behind the pilot’s head. This caused a significant blind spot to the rear. In late 1943 the design was modified to lower the rear deck and incorporate a bubble canopy that eliminated the blind spot.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft., 9 in.
Length 36 ft., 1 in.
Height 14 ft., 2 in.
Weight 14,925 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 433 MPH
Service Ceiling 42,000 ft
Engines One Pratt & Whitney R-2800-21 of 2,000 HP
Crew 1

Republic F-84C Thunderjet

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Republic
Markings
33rd Fighter Group, Walker AFB, New Mexico, 1948
Designation
F-84C
Serial Number
47-1433

Republic F-84C Thunderjet

The F-84 is Republic’s entry into America’s first generation of jet fighters. It was designed in 1944 in response to an Army Air Force request for a 600-mile per hour fighter. The first prototype flew in February 1946. The second prototype set an American speed record later that year. All versions of the F-84 except for the F-84F had straight wings. The F-84C used a slightly improved engine that allowed a heavier weight. A total of 191 F-84Cs were built.

Specifications
Wingspan 36 ft
Length 38 ft
Height 12 ft 10 in
Weight 18,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 596 mph
Service Ceiling 45,000 ft
Range 850 miles
Engines 1 Allison J35-A-17 turbojet4,000 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Republic RF-84F Thunderflash

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Republic
Markings
155th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, Nebraska Air National Guard, Lincoln Airport, Nebraska
Designation
RF-84F
Serial Number
51-1944

Republic RF-84F Thunderflash

The RF-84F is the first jet specifically designed for tactical reconnaissance to go into service with the U.S. Air Force. The aircraft was significantly redesigned from the other members of the F-84 family. Most obviously the engine intakes were relocated to the wing roots to allow the lengthened nose section to be used to house various cameras and electronic equipment. The Thunderflash first flew in 1952. Over 700 of them were built and they remained in service until the early 1970s.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft 7 in
Length 47 ft 7 in
Height 15 ft
Weight 25,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 650 mph
Service Ceiling 45,000 ft
Range 2,200 miles
Engines 1 Wright J65-W-7 turbojet 7,800 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Republic F-84F Thunderstreak

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Republic
Markings
U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds display team, 1956
Designation
F-84F
Serial Number
52-6563

Republic F-84F Thunderstreak

The F-84 is Republic’s entry into America’s first generation of jet fighters. It was designed in 1944 in response to an Army Air Force request for a 600-mile per hour fighter. The first prototype flew in February 1946. The second prototype set an American speed record later that year. All versions of the F-84 except for the F-84F had straight wings. The F model, influenced by the success of the F-86 had a swept wing that greatly improved speed and performance. The F-84 saw combat in the Korean War, serving mainly as fighter-bombers role for which it proved to be superbly suited. During the mid-1950s the U.S. Air Force decided that they needed an aerobatic display team to match the Navy’s Blue Angels and formed the Thunderbirds to display the latest in jet fighter technology. They chose the F-84 for the team due to its excellent low altitude performance.

Specifications
Wingspan 33 ft
Length 43 ft
Height 14 ft 4 in
Weight 28,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 695 mph
Service Ceiling 44,300 ft
Range 2,314 miles
Engines 1 Wright J65-W-3 turbojet 7,220 lbs thrust
Crew 1

Republic F-105G Thunderchief

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Republic
Markings
35th Tactical Fighter Wing, George AFB, California, 1979
Designation
F-105G
Serial Number
62-4427

Republic F-105G Thunderchief

Affectionately called “Thud” by its crews the Thunderchief was the first supersonic tactical fighter-bomber developed from scratch rather then from an earlier design. The F-105 was selected over the F-107 for production in a fly-off competition. The F-105F is a slightly larger two-seat version of the F-105D. Both cockpits are virtually identical and the aircraft can be flown from either one. The addition of the second crewman was intended to reduce the workload on the individual crewmen. The F-105F was adapted to the “Wild Weasel” mission in 1965. This mission involves the very dangerous job of attracting the attention of enemy air defenses, in particular radar-guided surface-to-air missiles so that the aircraft can locate and destroy the ground radars. The F-105G is a modified and improved F-105F that was introduced in 1967.

Specifications
Wingspan 34 ft 11 in
Length 67 ft
Height 20 ft 2 in
Weight 54,580 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,386 mph
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 1,500 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J-75P-19W, 26,500 lbs thrust with afterburner
Crew 2

Republic F-105D Thunderchief

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Republic
Markings
355th Tactical Fighter Wing, 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Takhli RTAFB, Thailand, 1969, “Big Sal.” Flown by Captain John Hoffman, and named for his wife Sally.
Designation
F-105D
Serial Number
61-0086

Republic F-105D Thunderchief

Affectionately called “Thud” by its crews the Thunderchief was the first supersonic tactical fighter-bomber developed from scratch rather then from an earlier design. The F-105 was selected over the F-107 for production in a fly-off competition. The “D” model introduced all weather capability and was the most widely used and produced version with 610 built. The F-105 served throughout the Vietnam War dropping thousands of tons of bombs on North Vietnamese targets. Thuds continued in U.S. Air Force service until the early 1980s when the last of them were retired out of the Air National Guard.

Specifications
Wingspan 34 ft 11 in
Length 64 ft 4 in
Height 19 ft 8 in
Weight 52,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,390 mph
Service Ceiling 52,000 ft
Range 2,070 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney J-75P-19W, 26,400 lbs thrust with afterburner
Crew 1