Sikorsky CH-37B Mojave

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
90th Transportation Company, Illesheim, West Germany, 1965
Designation
CH-37B
Serial Number
58-1005

Sikorsky CH-37B Mojave

In 1951 the U.S. Marines issued a requirement for a new heavy assault helicopter. Sikorsky’s offering was its first twin-engine helicopter, designated HR2S-1 by the Navy and H-37 by the Army. The Mojave was a radical design for its time, it had fully retractable main landing gear, and a front opening clamshell door, and the engines were located in large pods on each side of the main fuselage to the large five-blade rotor. This rotor was specially designed to allow the helicopter to continue flying if one of the blades was shot off. The Mojave began testing with both the Army and Marines in 1953. Deliveries to both services began in 1956 and production continued until 1960. Mojave’s served as heavy-lift transports until the early 1970s.

Specifications
Wingspan 72 ft
Length 64 ft 3 in
Height 22 ft
Weight 31,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 130 mph
Service Ceiling 8,700 ft
Range 145 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radials 2,100 hp each
Crew 2, 23 passengers

Sikorsky S-43 Baby Clipper

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
VMJ-2, San Diego, California, ca. 1939
Designation
S-43
Registration
NC16934
Serial Number
4325 1061

Sikorsky S-43 Baby Clipper

The Sikorsky S-43 and its military cousin, the JRS-1 were designed in the late 1930s as airliners and military personnel transports. Fifty-three were built between 1937 and 1941 for civilian customers and the U.S. Navy. A total of three S-43/JRS-1s survive today. Sometimes called the “Baby Clipper” S-43s served with Pan American Airlines and other airlines on shorter routes for which the larger flying boats were not needed. The Navy purchased seventeen of these aircraft with two of them going to the Marine Corps. Although this particular aircraft is actually an S-43, it has been painted in the U. S. Marine Corps markings of VMJ-2 out of deference to its owner: the U. S. Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum in Quantico, VA. The aircraft it represents was actually destroyed by fire in January 1942.

Specifications
Wingspan 86 ft
Length 51 ft 2 in
Height 17 ft 8 in
Weight 17,541 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 200 mph
Service Ceiling 20,000 ft
Range 775 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney R-1690, 800 hp each
Crew 3, passengers 15 commercial; 24

Sikorsky UH-19B Chickasaw

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
534th Air Defense Group, Kinross AFB, Michigan
Designation
UH-19B
Registration
N2256G
Serial Number
52-7537

Sikorsky UH-19B Chickasaw

In 1948 Sikorsky Aircraft began design of the Chickasaw for use as a cargo and personnel carrier. In order to maximize the size of the cabin the helicopter’s engine was placed in the nose. This allowed the cargo area to reside directly on the center of gravity, minimizing the effects of different loads on the helicopter’s balance. The first UH-19 flew in November 1949. The U.S. Air Force adopted the H-19 in 1951. Most were assigned to rescue duties and had a hoist installed above the cabin door. Every branch of the U.S. military, the U.S. Coast Guard, and several foreign nations eventually adopted the Chickasaw. It was the first helicopter approved for civil certification in the United States. A version called the Whirlwind was built in England by Westland.

Specifications
Wingspan 53 ft
Length 42 ft 3 in
Height 13 ft 4 in
Weight 7,900 lbs
Max. Speed 112 mph
Service Ceiling 15,000 ft
Range 360 miles
Engines 1 Wright R-1300-13 radial 800 hp
Crew 2, 10 passengers or 6 liter

Sikorsky VH-34C Choctaw

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
Executive Flight Detachment, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, 1960.
Designation
VH-34C
Serial Number
57-1684

Sikorsky VH-34C Choctaw

The U. S. Army selected the Sikorsky Choctaw in 1955 as a medium lift cargo and troop transport. Built as the CH-34A between 1955 and February of 1959 there were 426 Choctaws delivered to the Army. Others were delivered to the United States Air Force and Navy. Beginning in 1958 the Choctaw was upgraded to CH-34C standards with the installation of auto-stabilization systems to allow all-weather operations. Also beginning in 1958 several Choctaws were converted to VIP transports for use by the Executive Flight Detachment and provided helicopter transport for the President until the end of 1964 when all Presidential helicopter operations were transferred to the Marine Corps. The last Choctaw was retired from U.S. military service in 1974.

Specifications
Wingspan 56 ft
Length 46 ft 9 in
Height 15 ft 11 in
Weight 14,000 lbs
Max. Speed 123 mph
Service Ceiling 9,500 ft
Range 182 miles
Engines 1 Wright R-1820-84, 1,525 horsepower
Crew 2 pilots, 12-18 passengers

Sikorsky H-5G Dragonfly

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
6th Air Rescue Squadron, Goose Bay Air Base, Labrador, 1949
Designation
H-5G
Registration
N9845Z
Serial Number
48-0548

Sikorsky H-5G Dragonfly

The Sikorsky R-5 was the second helicopter type to go into full production for the U.S. Air Force. The R-4 used in the last stages of World War II was primarily a trainer while the R-5 was intended for observation and rescue duties. The R-5 prototype first flew in August 1943. When the US Air Force became an independent service in 1948 the designation letter for helicopters was changed from “R” to “H” and the Dragonflies were re-designated H-4. In June of that year the Air Force ordered 39 Dragonflies specially equipped for rescue operations with a hoist mounted on the left side of the helicopter. The H-5 remained in service up to the early 1960s, but is best known for its service rescuing downed pilots during the Korean War.

Specifications
Wingspan 48 ft
Length 41 ft 2 in
Height 12 ft 11 in
Weight 6,200 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 90 mph
Service Ceiling 10,000 ft
Range 280 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-5 450 hp
Crew 2

Sikorsky CH-54A Tarhe

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
273rd Aviation Company, U.S. Army, Vietnam
Designation
CH-54A
Serial Number
68-18437

Sikorsky CH-54A Tarhe

In 1959, Sikorsky Aircraft began testing of a proof-of-concept heavy lift helicopter called the S-60. Initial tests proved successful and the U.S. Navy and Army showed interest in the concept. Sikorsky immediately began development of a more powerful version of the helicopter powered by two turbo-shaft engines. Designated the S-64 by Sikorsky and the H-54A by the U.S. Army it made its first flight in May 1962. The U.S. Army named the helicopter Tarhe, but most people call them Skycranes. The CH-54 served through the last years of the Vietnam War and finally left military service in the early 1990s. Many surplus Skycranes have found new uses in civilian hands being widely used for fighting forest fires and as heavy lift aircraft for erecting electrical towers and in the timber industry.

Specifications
Wingspan 72 ft
Length 70 ft 3 in
Height 18 ft 7 in
Weight 42,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 126 mph
Service Ceiling 9,000 ft
Range 230 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney T73-P-1 turbo shaft 4,000 hp each
Crew 3

Sikorsky MH-53M Pave Low IV

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
20th Special Operations Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida, 2008
Designation
MH-53M
Serial Number
73-1649

Sikorsky MH-53M Pave Low IV

The MH-53M is the last version of the H-53 Super Jolly Green Giant that was developed during the Vietnam War. The H-53 was designed by Sikorsky to meet an Air Force requirement for a long range Combat Search and Rescue helicopter to supplement the HH-3 Jolly Green Giant. Based on the CH-53A Sea Stallion the HH-53B entered service in 1967 quickly followed by the HH-53C. The Air Force was very happy with the performance of the helicopter both in the search and rescue roll and as a transport for Special Forces troops. The only drawback of the helicopter was a lack of all-weather and night capability. To address this the HH-53s were modified under a program called “Pave Low” with night vision equipment and other sensors. The upgraded helicopters were redesignated as MH-53H. The final upgrade came with the MH-53M Pave Low IV which gave the helicopters even more capabilities with onboard mission planning computers and satellite communications allowing replanning of routes and missions while airborne.

Specifications
Wingspan 72 ft 3 in
Length 88 ft 2 in
Height 24 ft 11 in
Weight 42,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 186 mph
Service Ceiling 18,550 kt
Range 540 miles
Engines Two General Electric T64-GE-7 turboshafts with 3,925 horsepower
Crew 6

Sikorsky HH-3F Pelican

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
U.S. Coast Guard, Air Station Borinquen, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, 1984
Designation
HH-3F
Serial Number
USCG 1476

Sikorsky HH-3F Pelican

The white and orange helicopters of the U.S. Coast Guard have been a welcome sight along the coasts and waterways of the United States since the 1960s. From 1967 to 1994 the HH-3F Pelican served as the primary long-range search and rescue helicopter for the Coast Guard. The Pelican is basically identical to the U.S. Air Force’s HH-3E except for the deletion of armor and the refueling probe. During their service with the Coast Guard the Pelicans saved more than 23,000 lives and provided assistance to over 65,000 more.

Specifications
Wingspan 62 ft
Length 72 ft 8 in
Height 16 ft 10 in
Weight 22,050 lbs
Max. Speed 162
Service Ceiling 11,100 ft
Range 325 miles
Engines 1 General Electric T58-GE-5 1,500 hp each
Crew 4

Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
United States Coast Guard, Coast Guard Air Station Houston, Texas, ca. 1985
Designation
HH-52A
Serial Number
USCG 1450

Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard

In 1962, the U.S. Coast Guard selected a version of the civil Sikorsky S-62 amphibian helicopter to serve as its medium-range search and rescue helicopter. The S-62 was the first amphibious helicopter built with a flying boat type hull and was the first turbine-powered helicopter in Coast Guard service. The first HH-52A Seaguards entered service in 1963 with an eventual total of 99 in the Coast Guard. In addition to their service from shore bases the Seaguards also flew from Coast Guard icebreakers. The Seaguard remained in service until 1989 and was credited with saving the lives of over 15,000 people.

Specifications
Wingspan 53 ft
Length 44 ft 6 in
Height 16 ft
Weight 8,300 lbs
Max. Speed 125 mph
Service Ceiling 11,200 ft
Range 474 miles
Engines 1 General Electric T58-GE-8 turbo shaft with 845 hp
Crew 3

Sikorsky HO3S-1 Dragonfly

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Sikorsky
Markings
United States Coast Guard, Coast Guard Station Brooklyn, New York, 1946
Designation
HO3S-1
Registration
N4925E
Serial Number
USCG 232

Sikorsky HO3S-1 Dragonfly

The Sikorsky R-5 was the second helicopter type to go into full production for the U.S. Air Force. The R-4 used in the last stages of World War II was primarily a trainer while the R-5 was intended for observation and rescue duties. The R-5 prototype first flew in August 1943. When the US Air Force became an independent service in 1948 the designation letter for helicopters was changed from “R” to “H” and the Dragonflies were redesignated H-4. In 1946, the Dragonfly became the second helicopter to enter Coast Guard service under the Navy designation HO3S-1G. A total of 9 helicopters served from 1946 to 1959.

Specifications
Wingspan 48 ft
Length 41 ft 2 in
Height 12 ft 11 in
Weight 6,200 lbs
Max. Speed 90 mph
Service Ceiling 10,000 ft
Range 280 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-5 450 hp
Crew 2