Vought A-7E Corsair II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Vought
Markings
VA-46, USS John F. Kennedy, 1991
Designation
A-7E
Serial Number
160713

Vought A-7E Corsair II

The A-7 Corsair II was initially developed in response to a 1963 U.S. Navy requirement for an aircraft to replace the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. Since the Navy wanted the aircraft to be in service by 1967 speed of development was essential. The Vought company based their contract winning design on their F-8 Crusader which was already in Navy service. The prototype flew in 1965 and the first A-7 squadron entered combat in Vietnam in December 1967. The plane proved to be wildly successful as a close air support and strike aircraft. In 1968, the A-7D version of the Corsair II went into production. At the same time production began of the A-7E version for the Navy. These last two versions of the Corsair II are basically identical with the main difference being the equipment installed in the “E” for carrier operations.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 8 in
Length 46 ft 1 in
Height 16 ft 1 in
Weight 39,325 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 663 mph
Service Ceiling 33,500 ft
Range 3,044 miles
Engines 1 Allison TF41-A-1 turbofan with 14,800 pounds of thrust
Crew 1

Vought F4U-4 Corsair

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Vought
Markings
U.S. Marine Corps, 1952
Designation
F4U-4
Serial Number
97142

Vought F4U-4 Corsair

The Vought F4U Corsair is perhaps the best-known American naval fighter of World War II. Work on the Corsair began in 1938 in response to a Navy requirement for a new carrier based fighter and the prototype made its first flight in May 1940. By the end o that year the Corsair had been flown at speeds over 400 miles per hour, faster than any American fighter up to that time. The first production Corsairs were ordered in June 1941, and deliveries began in October 1942. The Corsair would eventually be in production for longer than any other American, World War II fighter with the last being delivered in 1952. The F4U-4 was introduced in April 1944 and featured a more powerful engine that raised its top speed to 446 miles per hour. The 4 version of the Corsair saw limited service in World War II, but was the mainstay of Marine ground attack squadrons during the Korean War.

Specifications
Wingspan 41 ft
Length 33 ft 8 in
Height 14 ft 9 in
Weight 14,670 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 446 mph
Service Ceiling 41,500 ft
Range 1,005 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-18W with 2,100 hp
Crew 1

Vought A-7D Corsair II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Vought
Markings
162nd Tactical Fighter Training Wing, Arizona Air national Guard, Tucson International Airport
Designation
A-7D
Serial Number
70-0973

Vought A-7D Corsair II

The A-7 Corsair II was initially developed in response to a 1963 U.S. Navy requirement for an aircraft to replace the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. Since the Navy wanted the aircraft to be in service by 1967 speed of development was essential. The Vought company based their contract-winning design on their F-8 Crusader which was already in Navy service. The prototype flew in 1965 and the first A-7 squadron entered combat in Vietnam in December 1967. The plane proved to be wildly successful as a close air support and strike aircraft. The U.S. Air Force was so impressed that for the second time in a decade they chose to adapt a Navy design for their own use. The A-7D joined the F-4 Phantom II in the Air Force inventory in 1968 and entered combat in 1972. Most of the Air Force’s A-7s found their way into the Air National Guard and remained in service until the late 1980s.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 9 in
Length 36 ft 4 in
Height 13 ft 11 in
Weight 42,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 715 mph
Service Ceiling 45,000 ft
Range 2,700 miles
Engines 1 Allison TF41-A-1 turbofan, 14,500 lbs thrust
Crew 1