WESTLAND LYSANDER Mk.III

A picture of the Westland Lysander Mk. III

The Westland Lysander was designed in 1934 as an Army cooperation plane. Its primary duties were tactical reconnaissance and artillery spotting. The aircraft features a high parasol wing and very good short take-off and landing performance. The first aircraft flew in 1936 and they entered service with the Royal Air Force in 1938. Frontline operations against the Germans proved highly dangerous for the Lysander crews even when the planes were escorted by fighters, and the Lysanders were quickly withdrawn to rear area duties. The exception were aircraft specially equipped for delivering intelligence agents and rescuing downed Allied aircrew. These black-painted aircraft flew in occupied France until the 1944 Allied invasion. In Canada, Lysanders served as army cooperation aircraft, target tugs for anti-aircraft gunnery training, and as trainers. By 1944, all the Canadian aircraft had been retired.

Wingspan

50ft

Length

30 ft 6 in.

Height

14 ft 6 in.

Weight

6,330 lbs (loaded)

Maximum Speed

212 mph

Service Ceiling

21,500 ft

Range

600 miles

Engines

One Bristol Mercury XX radial engine with 870 horse power

Crew

1

Manufacturer
Westland

Markings
None, awaiting restoration.

Designation
Lysander Mk.III

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