Curtiss F6C Hawk

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Curtiss
Markings
Marine Fighter Squadron 10 (VF-10M), NAS San Diego, 1931
Designation
F6C-4
Serial Number
A-7404

Curtiss F6C Hawk

The Curtiss F6C Hawk was an interwar Navy and Marine Corps single engine, single seat fighter based on the Army’s Curtiss P-6 Hawk. Like the P-6 the early versions of the F6C were powered by a Curtiss V-12 liquid cooled engine. The aircraft was armed with two .30 caliber machine guns and could carry a small bomb load. Due to the aircraft’s sturdy design and construction, the F6C became one of the Navy’s first aircraft capable of dive bombing at a steep angle. A prototype of an updated version of the Hawk, designated F6C-4, was delivered to the Navy in 1927. The Navy had decided that air cooled radials were easier to maintain than liquid cooled inline engines while at sea, so the F6C-4 was designed and built with a Pratt & Whitney R-1340. The Navy ordered thirty-one F6C-4s and assigned them to Fighter Squadron 2 (VF-2B) aboard the USS Lexington. The Navy retired them from front line service in 1930, though the Marine Corps continued to use them until late 1932. Most of the Marine F6C-4s were assigned to Marine Fighter Squadron 10 (VF-10M) at Naval Air Station San Diego.

Specifications
Wingspan 37 ft 6 in
Length 22 ft 6 in
Height 10 ft 11 in
Weight 2,785 pounds (loaded)
Max. Speed 155 mph
Service Ceiling 22,900 ft
Range 360 miles
Engines One Pratt & Whitney R-1340 radial
Crew 1

Curtiss O-52 Owl

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Curtiss
Markings
22nd Observation Squadron, Brooks Field, Texas, ca. 1942
Designation
O-52
Serial Number
40-2746

Curtiss O-52 Owl

Developed in 1939, the Owl is the last heavy observation aircraft developed for the Army Air Force. The concept of the two-seat observation aircraft dates to World War I, but by 1941 the Army Air Force had determined that the Owl was no match for modern combat conditions. The aircraft’s tactical observation role was given to light planes modified from civilian designs while its long range duties were taken by bombers and modified fighters. The 203 Owls built were quickly relegated to training and coastal patrol duties.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft 10 in
Length 26 ft 5 in
Height 9 ft 11 in
Weight 5,364 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 215 mph
Service Ceiling 23,200 ft
Range 455 miles
Engines 1 Pratt & Whitney R-1340-51 radial with 600 horsepower
Crew 2

Curtiss P-40E Warhawk

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Curtiss
Markings
49th Fighter Group, 9th Fighter Squadron, Darwin, Australia, 1942
Designation
P-40E
Serial Number
41-25163

Curtiss P-40E Warhawk

The P-40 is probably the most recognizable of the Curtiss Aircraft Company’s designs. Developed from the P-36A in 1938 the P-40 was technologically inferior to the fighters then in production and development elsewhere in the world. However, it was ordered in large numbers by the U.S. Army and in smaller numbers by the British and French primarily because it could be built quickly and in large numbers using existing production lines. The P-40E model was upgraded with six wing mounted .50 caliber machine guns in place of the original four wing guns. The P-40 remained in production until 1944 and served throughout the war, despite being superseded by newer designs. Curtiss built a total of 13,738 aircraft, by far the largest production run of any Curtiss design. This aircraft has been reconstructed from the parts of several P-40s.

Specifications
Wingspan 37 ft 4 in
Length 37 ft 4 in
Height 12 ft 4 in
Weight 8,840 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 354 mph
Service Ceiling 32,400 ft
Range 716 miles
Engines 1 Allison V-1710-33 with 1,040 horsepower
Crew 1

Curtiss C-46D Commando

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
Curtiss
Markings
2nd Combat Cargo Group, 5th Combat Cargo Squadron, Townsville, Australia, 1944
Designation
C-46D
Serial Number
44-77635

Curtiss C-46D Commando

Designed in the late 1930s as an airliner the Commando was quickly adopted by the Army Air Force because of its particularly large fuselage. The first C-46s entered service in 1942 and proved to be very well suited to military service. The Commando was very heavily used in the Pacific and became a very familiar sight flying “The Hump” cargo routes over the mountains between India and China. Commandos continued in service in fairly large numbers after the war and the last of them served with the 1st Air Commando Group in Vietnam during 1962.

Specifications
Wingspan 108 ft 1 in
Length 76 ft 4 in
Height 21 ft 9 in
Weight 56,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 269 mph
Service Ceiling 27,600 ft
Range 1,200 miles
Engines 2 Two Pratt & Whitney R-2800-51 radials, 2,000 horsepower each
Crew 4, 50 passengers