McDonnell Douglas F-4C Phantom II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell Douglas
Markings
8th Tactical Fighter Wing, 433rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, 1967
Designation
F-4C
Serial Number
64-0673

McDonnell Douglas F-4C Phantom II

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II was designed as a missile-armed fleet defense fighter for the United States Navy. In 1962, the U.S. Air Force selected the F-4 for its own use as both a fighter and a fighter-bomber. Originally designated F-110 by the Air Force the plane became the F-4C under the unified designation scheme ordered by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara. The F-4C is the first version of the Phantom built for the Air Force. Construction began in 1962 and concluded in 1966 with 583 built.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 5 in
Length 58 ft 3 in
Height 16 ft 3 in
Weight 60,630 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,583 mph
Service Ceiling 62,000 ft
Range 1,750 miles
Engines 2 General Electric J79-GE-15 17,900 lbs thrust
Crew 2

McDonnell Douglas YF-4J Phantom II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell Douglas
Markings
Naval Air Test Facility, Lakehurst Naval Air Station, New Jersey, 1974
Designation
YF-4J
Serial Number
151497

McDonnell Douglas YF-4J Phantom II

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II was designed as a missile-armed fleet defense fighter for the United States Navy. The F-4B became the primary Navy and Marine fighter in the first half of the 1960s. In late 1964 three F-4Bs were converted to test numerous improvements to the basic design and designated YF-4J. Improved aerodynamics to lower take-off distances and decrease landing speeds, improved engines, upgraded radar, and better ground attack ability were the primary changes. Over 500 of this version of the Phantom were built between 1966 and 1972.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 5 in
Length 58 ft 3 in
Height 15 ft 8 in
Weight 56,000 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,428 mph
Service Ceiling 64,700 ft
Range 1,750 miles
Engines 2 General Electric J79-GE-10 turbojets 17,900 lbs thrust each
Crew 2

McDonnell Douglas F-15A Eagle

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell Douglas
Markings
325th Tactical Fighter Wing, Tyndall AFB, Florida, 1992
Designation
F-15A
Serial Number
74-0118

McDonnell Douglas F-15A Eagle

Specifications
Wingspan 42 ft 9.7 in
Length 63 ft 9 in
Height 18 ft 5.5 in
Weight 42,206 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed Mach 2.5
Service Ceiling 62,000 ft
Range 2,500 miles
Engines 2 Pratt & Whitney F-100-PW-100, 23,930 lbs thrust
Crew 1

McDonnell Douglas F/A-18A Hornet

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell Douglas
Markings
U.S. Navy Blue Angels, 2012
Designation
F/A-18A Hornet
Serial Number
163093

McDonnell Douglas F/A-18A Hornet

The Hornet was developed in the mid-1970s as a replacement for the F-4 Phantom and the A-7 Corsair that were then in use by the U.S. Navy and Marines as ground attack aircraft. The F/A-18 was derived from the YF-17 that had competed for the U.S. Air Force contract that resulted in the F-16 Fighting Falcon. The YF-17 was redesigned to add more fuel, folding wings, and strengthened landing gear among other changes to adapt it for use from aircraft carriers. The first production versions of the Hornet went into service with the Navy and Marines in 1983. Most of the early F/A-18A Hornets have been retired but some continue to fly with Navy and Marine training squadrons. The F/A-18C and the newest F/A-18E and F Super Hornets are the primary fighters and attack aircraft for the US Navy and Marines. Hornets have been sold to several foreign nations including Australia, Canada, Spain, Switzerland, Finland, Kuwait, and Malaysia.

The F/A-18 was adopted by the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels aerial demonstration team in 1986. It has now served with the team for 26 years. That makes it the longest serving aircraft type to fly with the Navy’s aerial demonstration team.

Specifications
Wingspan 40 ft
Length 56 ft
Height 15 ft 4 in
Weight 36,970 lbs
Max. Speed Mach 1.8
Service Ceiling 50,000 ft
Range 1,089 miles
Engines Two General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofans
Crew 1

McDonnell Douglas F-4N Phantom II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell Douglas
Markings
Fighter Squadron 21 (VF-21), USS Ranger, 1983
Designation
F-4N
Serial Number
153016

McDonnell Douglas F-4N Phantom II

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II was designed as a missile-armed fleet defense fighter for the United States Navy. The F-4B became the primary Navy and Marine fighter in the first half of the 1960s. By 1970, the Navy was concerned with the aging condition of its large fleet of F-4Bs. With the replacement F-14 still several years from deployment the Navy decided on a program to upgrade the F-4B and extend its service life. Over 200 F-4Bs were virtually rebuilt from the ground up as the F-4N model. Upgrades to the airframe, engines, and electronics brought them up to the standard of the F-4J. The F-4N remained in Navy service until 1983.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 5 in
Length 58 ft 3 in
Height 16 ft 3 in
Weight 43,907 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,485 mph
Service Ceiling 62,000 ft
Range 2,925 miles
Engines 2 General Electric J79-GE-18 turbojets with 17,900 pounds of thrust
Crew 2

McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantom II

Pima Air and Space Museum Aircraft

Manufacturer
McDonnell Douglas
Markings
USAF Thunderbirds, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, 1973
Designation
F-4E
Serial Number
66-0329

McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantom II

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II was designed as a missile-armed fleet defense fighter for the United States Navy. In 1962, the U.S. Air Force selected the F-4 for its own use as both a fighter and a fighter-bomber. Originally designated F-110 by the Air Force the plane became the F-4C under the unified designation scheme ordered by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara. The F-4E is a greatly improved version of the Phantom with numerous improvements to the engines and electronic systems. The most recognizable change is the addition of an internally mounted gun for air-to-air combat. This addressed the greatest combat weakness of the Phantom. The F-4E is the most produced version of the Phantom with a total of 1,387 built for the U.S. Air Force and foreign customers.

Specifications
Wingspan 38 ft 5 in
Length 63 ft
Height 16 ft 6 in
Weight 55,957 lbs (loaded)
Max. Speed 1,485 mph
Service Ceiling 62,250 ft
Range 1,885 miles
Engines 2 General Electric J79-GE-17 turbojets 17,900 thrust each
Crew 2